Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

Tag: corruption

  • The Decline of the Indonesian Constitutional Court

    –Stefanus Hendrianto, Pontifical Gregorian University On August 13, 2023, Indonesia celebrates the twentieth anniversary of the establishment of the country’s Constitutional Court. When the Court was initially established twenty years ago, it was a kind of joke that later turned out to be a serious affair.[1]

  • Lula is Free: The Brazilian Supreme Court’s Habeas Decision and the 2022 Election

    —Felipe Oliveira de Sousa, Center for Law, Behaviour and Cognition (CLBC), Ruhr-Universität Bochum On March 8, 2021, Judge Edson Fachin from the Brazilian Supreme Court (STF) made a decision that might decisively affect the course of the next presidential elections in Brazil, in 2022.

  • Dominant Assumptions: Reading Between the Lines of a New South African Party Funding Decision (I-CONnect Column)

    —James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts.

  • Zuma’s South Africa: A Constitutional Post-Mortem (I-CONnect Column)

    —James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts.

  • Brazilian Democratic Decay and the Fear of the People

    —Juliano Zaiden Benvindo & Fernando José Gonçalves Acunha, University of Brasília A recurring trend in comparative constitutional law is the emerging populism, which, in its various forms, extends to places and contexts as diverse as the United States, Poland, Turkey, Hungary, the Philippines, Latin America and so forth.

  • Special Report on Romanian Parliamentary Elections

    —Bianca Selejan-Guțan, PhD, Professor of Constitutional Law, “Lucian Blaga” University of Sibiu, Romania The most recent parliamentary elections in Romania, held last month in December 2016, did not bring about many surprises. In this special report, I shall draw the picture of the general context of the elections and I shall also try to present an accurate image of Romanian society 27 years after the fall of the totalitarian regime, as far as democratic values are concerned.

  • Abusive Judicial Activism and Judicial Independence in Brazil

    —Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília When delivering his speech at the Brazilian Supreme Court on December 5 on “Public Ethics and Democracy,” Michael Sandel, Professor at Harvard University, could not foresee what was about to happen that very day just some floors above the conference room.

  • The Latest Scholarship at Ius Publicum Network Review

    —Gabriella M. Racca, University of Turin As announced earlier this year, I-CONnect and IUS Publicum Network review have entered into a partnership to deepen the study of comparative public law and to enhance its online coverage. The IUS Publicum Network review is a network of the national leading public and administrative law journals in Europe, whose aim is to track and interpret the evolution of public law in each country involved, pointing out its influences on the construction of an administrative and public European law and its connections with other legal cultures.

  • Turkey’s Presidential Elections: Towards the Confrontation between Constitutionalism and Power Politics

    –Bertil Emrah Oder, Koç University Law School The expected has happened: Prime Minister Erdoğan is the President-elect. He won in the first round of elections on August 10, 2014, by receiving an absolute majority of the valid votes cast, namely 51.79%.[i]

  • The Indonesian Constitutional Court at a Tipping Point

    —Stefanus Hendrianto, Santa Clara University On Wednesday, October 2, 2013, the Corruption Eradication Commission (Komisi Pemberantasan Korupsi – KPK) arrested Akil Mochtar, the Chief Justice of the Indonesian Constitutional Court, for alleged bribery. The spokesperson of the Commission said that the alleged bribery was linked to a regional election dispute case.