Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

Tag: Sri Lankan Constitution

  • Book Review: Donald L. Horowitz’s “Constitutional Processes and Democratic Commitment”

    [Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, David Landau reviews Donald L. Horowitz’s Constitutional Processes and Democratic Commitment (Yale University Press, 2021).] —David Landau, Florida State University College of Law Twenty-seven years ago, Jon Elster noted that there were few thorough, high-quality studies of the process of constitution making around the world.

  • Symposium |Constitutional Struggles in Asia | Part I | Drifting Between Democracy and Despotism in Sri Lanka

    [Editor’s Note: In light of recent constitutional (or some may say, unconstitutional) developments, I-CONnect is pleased to feature this timely symposium examining constitutional struggles in Asia. This is part I of a five part series, in addition to the Introduction.] — Mario Gomez, Executive Director, International Centre for Ethnic Studies, Sri Lanka Sri Lanka once more, entered the fold of constitutional authoritarianism with the passage of the 20th Amendment to the constitution in October 2020.

  • Navigating Constitution Building and Political Transitions in Sri Lanka

    —Dian A H Shah, National University Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts.

  • Challenging “Divine” Law: Protecting Gender Rights in Sri Lanka and Beyond

    —Dian A H Shah, National University Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts.

  • The Courts Respond to Executive Tyranny in Sri Lanka

    –Mario Gomez, Executive Director, International Centre for Ethnic Studies (Sri Lanka); previously Lecturer at the University of Colombo The final three months of 2018 were challenging times for constitutional resilience and order in Sri Lanka. Almost four years since the peaceful political transition of 2015, the country plunged into a constitutional crisis when President Sirisena purported to sack Prime Minister Wickremesinghe on October 26, replacing him with former President Rajapakse.

  • Three Key Constitutional Reforms for Sri Lanka

    –Ashwini Vasanthakumar (University College, Oxford) and Rehan Abeyratne (Jindal Global Law School) On January 8, 2015, Sri Lanka elected Maithripala Sirisena as its new President. Sirisena was an unlikely victor. He was Minister of Health and General Secretary of President Rajapaksa’s Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) until November 2014 when he was chosen to be the opposition’s common candidate.[1]