Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

Tag: European Parliament

  • Book Review: Sabrina Ragone on “An Uneven Balance? A Legal Analysis of Power Asymmetries between National Parliaments in the EU” (Hoai-Thu Nguyen)

    [Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Sabrina Ragone reviews Hoai-Thu Nguyen’s book on An Uneven Balance? A Legal Analysis of Power Asymmetries between National Parliaments in the EU (Eleven Publishing, 2018).] —Sabrina Ragone, Associate Professor of Comparative Public Law, University of Bologna.

  • Book Review: Barbara Guastaferro on Nicola Lupo and Cristina Fasone’s “Interparliamentary Cooperation in the Composite European Constitution”

    [Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Barbara Guastaferro reviews Nicola Lupo and Cristina Fasone’s book on Interparliamentary Cooperation in the Composite European Constitution (Oxford: Hart 2016)] —Barbara Guastaferro, Research Fellow in Law, Durham Law School and Assistant Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Naples “Federico II” This edited volume analyses the functioning of inter-parliamentary cooperation in the EU composite constitutional order, providing a bridge between scholars from both legal and political backgrounds and practitioners focused on parliamentary studies.

  • Europeanizing the Eurozone

    —Tomas Dumbrovsky, J.S.D. Candidate at the Yale Law School and Assistant Professor at Charles University in Prague. The way the Greek debt crisis was handled in the last weeks has been a public relations nightmare. The more or less rational debate about different economic and political views has succumbed to the irrationality of harmed feelings, humiliation, revenge, and distrust.

  • The German Constitutional Court’s Latest Decision on European Elections: No Protection Needed

    —Dr. Markus W. Gehring, Deputy Director, Centre for European Legal Studies, Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge & Fellow in Law, Hughes Hall, and Ad personam Jean Monnet Chair in Sustainable Development Law & Associate Professor, University of Ottawa, Canada The German (Federal) Constitutional Court ruled two days ago on February 26 that the 3% hurdle for European Parliament elections is unconstitutional under German law, so that European Union (EU) elections will be conducted in Germany without a minimum percentage of the popular vote to be obtained by the contesting parties.