Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

Tag: European Court of Human Rights

  • Abortion and Selective Conscientious Objection

    —Teresa Violante, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg [Editor’s Note: This is one of our ICONnect columns. For more on our 2023 columnists, see here.] Universal conscientious objection in the health sector challenges the provision of legally guaranteed services, thus possibly jeopardizing the right to health of affected persons.

  • The Beginning of the End for Vagrancy Laws?

    —Christopher Roberts, Assistant Professor, Chinese University of Hong Kong. During the drafting of the European Convention on Human Rights, Sweden suggested an amendment to the provision protecting liberty and security of the person, stipulating that vagrancy and alcohol abuse be recognized as grounds upon which individuals might be detained.[1]

  • The Vices of Leaving This Undecided

    —Renáta Uitz, Central European University [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts.

  • Crisis and its Opposite: A Reminiscence of Same-Sex Marriage’s Most Successful Year (I-CONnect Column)

    —James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts.

  • Book Review: Eric C. Christiansen on Angioletta Sperti’s “Constitutional Courts, Gay Rights and Sexual Orientation Equality”

    [Note: In this installment of  I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Eric C. Christiansen reviews Angioletta Sperti’s “Constitutional Courts, Gay Rights and Sexual Orientation Equality” (Hart Publishing, 2017).] —Eric C. Christiansen, Professor of Law, Golden Gate University School of Law, San Francisco, California USA and Visiting Fulbright Professor, University of Valencia, Spain.

  • Slovakia Tackles Its Constitutional Skeleton in the Closet

    —Michal Ovádek, Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, University of Leuven On 31 May 2017, six days before a parliament imposed deadline and 19 years after the fact, the Constitutional Court of the Slovak Republic (CC) upheld constitutional changes which annulled amnesties introduced by the former strongman prime minister and acting president Vladimír Mečiar (‘Mečiar’s amnesties’).

  • Developments in Belgian Constitutional Law: The Year 2015 in Review

    [Editor’s Note: This is the fourth installment in our Year-in-Review series. We welcome similar reports from scholars around the world on their own jurisdictions for publication on I-CONnect. Earlier year-in-review reports have been published on Italy, the Slovak Republic and Romania. 

  • Developments in Italian Constitutional Law: The Year 2015 in Review

    [Editor’s Note: In this special post, we feature a 2015 year-in-review of developments in Italian Constitutional Law. We are grateful to Marta Cartabia, Pietro Faraguna, Michele Massa and Diletta Tega for this important contribution to the study of comparative public law.

  • Book Review/Response: Rayner Thwaites and Daniel Wilsher on Indefinite Detention of Non-Citizens

    [Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review/Response Series, Daniel Wilsher reviews Rayner Thwaites’ recent book on The Liberty of Non-Citizens: Indefinite Detention in Commonwealth Countries (Hart 2014). Rayner Thwaites then responds to the review.] Review by Daniel Wilsher –Daniel Wilsher, City University London, reviewing Rayner Thwaites, The Liberty of Non-Citizens: Indefinite Detention in Commonwealth Countries (Hart 2014) In his book Rayner Thwaites provides a detailed analysis and critique of the jurisprudence surrounding long-term (indeed, indefinite) immigration detention in the United Kingdom, Canada and Australia.

  • When is a Criminal Prohibition of Genocide Denial Justified? Lessons from Perinçek Case

    —Javid Gadirov, Assistant Professor, ADA University (Azerbaijan) It may seem surprising to readers in the United States that there is a criminal prohibition of the denial of the Holocaust in Germany, and of genocides and crimes against humanity in other European countries.