Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

Tag: democratic transitions

  • Should Egypt Drop the Presidency?

    —David Landau, Florida State University College of Law Bruce Ackerman recently wrote an op-ed in the New York Times calling for Egypt to drop the institution of the presidency from its new constitutional order, and instead to use a parliamentary system with a constructive vote of no confidence.

  • Bachelet Appoints Group to Study New Constitution for Chile

    —Claudia Heiss, Instituto de Asuntos Publicos, Universidad de Chile On April 23rd former President of Chile Michelle Bachelet (2006-2010), the front-runner candidate for the November presidential election, announced a commission to study a new constitution. The group is composed of nine lawyers (including two women) some of whom contributed to the 2005 reform signed by Bachelet’s predecessor Ricardo Lagos.

  • The Constitutional Future of Venezuela

    —David Landau, FSU College of Law Hugo Chavez’s death poses important questions about the constitutional future of a country that many political analysts have seen as a hybrid or competitive authoritarian regime – that is, somewhere between pure democracy and dictatorship.

  • Is Egypt’s Transition to Democracy Really So Stupid?

    —William Partlett, Columbia University Law School & Brookings Institution [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt.

  • Egypt and the Forgotten Lessons of Democratic Transitions (Or: Democracy is Hard)

    —David Landau, Florida State University College of Law [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt.