Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

Tag: Constitution of Nepal

  • Gender Equality and the Complete Decriminalisation of Abortion

    —Mara Malagodi, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Law [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.] Recent legal changes in a number of jurisdictions that have entirely decriminalised abortion are steeped in the language of gender constitutionalism and human rights – whether these changes have taken place via constitutional litigation or statutory reform.

  • Constituent Power and the Politics of Unamendability

    —Mara Malagodi, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Law; Rehan Abeyratne, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Law; and Ngoc Son Bui, The University of Oxford [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.]

  • The Blurred Line Between Law and Politics: The Supreme Court of Nepal Blocks a Parliamentary Dissolution

    —Mara Malagodi, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Law [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.] On 23 February 2021, the Constitutional Bench of the Supreme Court of Nepal handed down its long-awaited judgment in the controversial case on the constitutionality of the House of Representatives’ dissolution by Prime Minister K.P.

  • International Assistance to Constitution Making between Principle and Expediency

    —Mara Malagodi, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Law [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.] In the aftermath of the Cold War many countries underwent political transitions coupled with extensive constitutional changes.

  • Joint Symposium on “Towering Judges”: A Foundational, not Towering, Judge

    [Editor’s Note: This is part of the joint I-CONnect/IACL-AIDC Blog symposium on “towering judges,” which emerged from a conference held earlier this year at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, organized by Professors Rehan Abeyratne (CUHK) and Iddo Porat (CLB). The author in this post formed part of a panel on “Towering Judges in New/Mixed Constitutions.”

  • Nepal: Agree to (have the Supreme Court) Disagree

    —Vikram Aditya Narayan, Advocate, Supreme Court of India Until a couple of decades ago, federalism was nothing more than an academic subject in Nepal. However, it has now become a political reality, with the Parliament/Constituent Assembly deliberating over the manner in which Nepal can and should transform itself under the new Constitution.