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Editorial – I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

Category: Editorial

  • ICON Volume 22, Issue 1: Table of Contents

    I•CON Volume 22 Issue 1 Table of Contents Letters to the Editors Zhaoxin Jiang, A constitutional court’s survival (by any name) Ming-Sung Kuo, The “constitutional court of China”? Setting the record straight Zhaoxin Jiang, State-centered liberal constitutionalism: An underappreciated legacy of “China’s Constitutional Court” Editorial: In this issue; The human ChatGPT—The use and abuse of…

  • Introducing the 2024 ICONnect Columnists

    —David Landau, Florida State University College of Law The editors of ICONnect are very pleased to announce our new slate of columnists for 2024: Esther Ang’awa,  Aparna Chandra, Tania Groppi, and Miguel Schor. We are certain that they will provide a diverse and fascinating set of voices for our readers, representing a range of regional…

  • ICON Volume 21, Issue 4: Editorial

    Editorial: In this issue; In this issue—Reviews; 10 good reads 2023 In this issue In an Editorial Reflection, Aileen Kavanagh considers the importance of unwritten norms to written constitutions—and to the study of comparative constitutional law. According to Kavanagh, closer attention to these norms will deepen our understanding of fundamental constitutional commitments, broaden our understanding…

  • ICON Volume 21, Issue 4: Table of Contents

    I•CON Volume 21 Issue 4 Table of Contents Editorial: In this issue; In this issue—Reviews; 10 good reads 2023 Editorial Reflection Aileen Kavanagh, The ubiquity of unwritten constitutionalism Articles Jeffrey Steven Gordon, Comparative judicial federalism Julen Etxabe, A dialogical model of human rights adjudication Neli Frost, The global “political voice deficit matrix” I•CON: Debate!

  • Editorial: The human ChatGPT—The use and abuse of research assistants

    [Editor’s Note: This Editorial is forthcoming in ICON] Recent meetings of the Advisory Boards of I•CON and EJIL were dedicated, among other issues, to, surprise surprise, the ChatGPT challenge. In the context of law faculties and legal education, one acute problem, as a recent Editorial noted, relates to the possible use of AI by students…

  • 10 Good Reads 2023

    —J. H. H. Weiler, New York University School of Law; Co-Editor-in-Chief, I·CON Here, again, is my pick of “Good Reads” from the books I read in 2023. I want to remind you, as I do every year, that these are not “book reviews,” which also explains the relative paucity of law books or books about the…

  • ICON’s Latest Issue: Table of Contents

    Volume 21 Issue 3 Table of Contents Letters to the Editors Ming-Sung Kuo, Naming and (Mis)Informing in Academic Publications Editorial Articles Andrew Edgar and Kevin M. Stack, Parallel incorporation and public law Anna Wallerman Ghavanini, Gunnar Grendstad, and Johan Karlsson Schaffer, Institutions that define the policymaking role of courts: A comparative analysis of the supreme…

  • Convocatoria Cuarto Número en Español: International Journal of Constitutional Law (ICON)

    Tras el éxito de la convocatoria a los primeros números en español, el International Journal of Constitutional Law (ICON) tiene el agrado de anunciar que el tercer número en español se publicará en el volumen 21, número 5, de este año.

  • Editorial: Open Access: No Closed Matter

    [Editor’s note: This Editorial is forthcoming in Volume 23, Issue 1 of ICON.] The move to Open Access publishing has been driven in large part by a desire to make research publicly available and to make knowledge less exclusive. The journals that we edit have long been committed to these objectives.

  • ICON’s Latest Issue: Table of Contents

    Volume 21 Issue 2 Table of Contents Letters to the Editors Urška Šadl, Citation dice are loaded Editorial ChatGPT and law exams; In this issue Editorial Reflection Anna Śledzińska-Simon, Constitutional framings of the right to abortion: A global view Articles Rosalind Dixon and Mila Versteeg, Unsexing citation: Closing the gender gap in global public law …