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Developments – Page 3 – I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

Category: Developments

  • Call for Papers: International Conference on ‘Unwritten Constitutionalism and Public Law in Central and Eastern Europe,’ Central and Eastern European Chapter, ICON-S

    International Conference on‘Unwritten Constitutionalism and Public Law in Central and Eastern Europe’Faculty of Law, ‘Lucian Blaga’ University of SibiuSibiu, Romania12 April 2024Convened by:David Kosar, Bianca Selejan-Gutan, and Silvia Suteu The Central and Eastern European Chapter of the International Society of Public Law (ICON-S) is pleased to invite submissions to its 2024 annual conference taking place…

  • What’s New in Public Law

    —Juan Sebastián López, researcher in international human rights law and constitutional law, former student at Universidad Externado de Colombia, and staff member of the International Society of Public Law. In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law.

  • A Super Judgment on the Super League: The CJEU’s Antitrust Decision on Football

    –Ketan Gupta, N.Y.U. School of Law The unipolar nature of sports governance, wherein the gameplay as well as the economics of a sport are shaped by one dominant sport federation, stretches across geographies and across sports such as golf, tennis, and football.

  • What’s New in Public Law

    —Anubhav Kumar, Advocate & Researcher, Supreme Court of India  In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books, articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere.

  • What’s New in Public Law

    —Amir Cahane, PhD student, Hebrew University of Jerusalem –Carolina Gomide de Araujo, Master’s student, University of São Paulo In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts…

  • What’s New in Public Law

    —Surbhi Karwa, PhD Candidate, UNSW – Sydney —Yacine Ben Chaabane Mousli, University Paris Panthéon-Assas, Law clerk at the Administrative Court of Paris In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and…

  • What’s New in Public Law

    —Leigha Crout, PhD Candidate at King’s College London & Rule of Law Fellow at Stanford Law School —Tina Nicole Nelly Youan, PhD Candidate at Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3 Université In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law.

  • Chile’s Constitutional Proposal Represents a More Radical Turn into Neoliberal Constitutional Politics

    –Benjamín Alemparte, academic and researcher, University of Chile The recent election in Argentina of Javier Milei as new President has brought a renewed attention to the southern American region in terms of a more radical turn into libertarian economic policies. Milei’s candidature, a Thatcher-lover according to the Financial Times, suggested an ultra-neoliberal “shock” including, among…

  • What’s New in Public Law

    –Silvio Roberto Vinceti, Research Fellow (Post-Doc), Department of Law, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the…

  • Constitutional Dialogue or Crisis between Congress and the Supreme Court: A New Equilibrium in Brazil’s Coalition Presidentialism?

    —Emilio Peluso Neder Meyer, Associate Professor at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, and Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, Associate Professor at the University of Brasília A fascinating discussion is currently underway in Brazil, whose Supreme Court is known as one of the most stable and interventionist in political affairs in Latin America.