Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

Category: constitutional law

  • The Top Constitutional Events Of 2014

      2014 was a landmark year for governments around the world. Here are some of the most important constitutional events of the past twelve months, brought to you by the Comparative Constitutions Project and Constitute.   Jan|Feb|Mar|May|Jun|Sept|Oct|Nov|Dec     January: Egypt Holds Constitutional Referendum On January 24, 2014, poll results showed that Egyptian voters approved a constitutional referendum by over 98 percent.

  • Right to Rebel in Venezuela

    This is the second country study in Tom Ginsburg and I’s ongoing project to identify the potential risks and rewards of a constitutional Right to Rebel – Venezuela has had 26 separate constitutions since independence and the most recent have included various justifications for a popular right to rebel.

  • The Election Law Passed But Iraq Still Stands To Miss a Constitutional Dead Line

    The impasse over Iraq’s election law has now caused United Nations officials to publicly admit what many have feared for weeks — Iraq is going to miss its constitutionally mandated deadline for parliamentary elections. Delays this past summer and fall were do to two key disagreements among Iraqi law-makers: (1) whether to have open or closed list voting; and (2) how to deal with Iraq’s disputed territory of Kirkuk.

  • Honduras: When Constitutions Collide?

    The constitutional fracas in Honduras is attracting a good deal of attention from comparative constitutional scholars, and deservedly so. One aspect of the entire mess that appears to have largely escaped attention–but raises a number of important questions with ramifications far beyond Honduras itself–is the relationship between domestic and supranational constitutional law.