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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
Home Posts tagged "unamendability"
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I-CONnect Video Interview Series: Jean-Philippe Derosier on National Limits to European Integration

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this latest installment of our video interview series at I-CONnect, I interview Jean-Philippe Derosier on the subject of national constitutional limits to European Integration. The subject of our discussion is his recent book, published in May 2015, entitled “Les limites constitutionnelles à l’intégration européenne,” a comparative study of limits

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Published on September 16, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Honduran Supreme Court Renders Inapplicable Unamendable Constitutional Provisions

–Leiv Marsteintredet, Associate Professor in Latin American Area Studies, University of Oslo; Associate Professor in Comparative Politics, University of Bergen In a unanimous judgment on April 22, 2015,[1] the Constitutional Chamber of the Honduran Supreme Court rendered inapplicable and without effect the unamendable provisions in the 1982 Honduran Constitution. These unamendable provisions prohibit presidential re-election and make

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Published on May 2, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Video Interview: Unamendability and Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendments Featuring Yaniv Roznai

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this latest installment of our new video interview series at I-CONnect, I interview Yaniv Roznai on unamendability and unconstitutional constitutional amendments. In the interview, we explore discuss the paradox of the concept of an unconstitutional constitutional amendment, the origins and modern legal implications of the concept, whether one can

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Published on November 4, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Unamendable Corwin Amendment

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Article V entrenches rules to formally amend the United States Constitution. It has been used to make and memorialize many democratic advances since the country’s founding, from the First Amendment’s protections for speech and religion, to the Fourteenth Amendment’s guarantee of equality, to the Twenty-Sixth Amendment’s expansion of the

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Published on February 27, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis