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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Thailand"
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Symposium |Constitutional Struggles in Asia | Part V | Determining What is ‘Thai’: Thailand’s Constitutional Court and Identity Polarisation

[Editor’s Note: In light of recent constitutional (or some may say, unconstitutional) developments, I-CONnect is pleased to feature this timely symposium examining constitutional struggles in Asia. This is part V of a five part series, in addition to the Introduction.] — Rawin Leelapatana (Faculty of Law, Chulalongkorn University) and Suprawee Asanasak (Faculty of Law, Thammasat

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Published on February 25, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium on Constitutional Struggles in Asia: Introduction

[Editor’s Note: In light of recent constitutional (or some may say, unconstitutional) developments, I-CONnect is pleased to feature this timely symposium examining constitutional struggles in Asia. This introduction will be followed by five posts exploring and contextualizing constitutional struggles in five countries in Asia.] —Dian A H Shah (National University of Singapore), Andrew Harding (National

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Published on February 19, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Thailand’s Supreme Court and the Prosecution of Thailand’s Successive Prime Ministers

—Eugénie Mérieau, University of Goettingen On 27 September 2017, Thailand’s Supreme Court convicted ex-prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra to a 5-year jail sentence.  Almost ten years ago, it had convicted her elder brother, ex-premier Thaksin Shinawatra to a 2-year imprisonment[1]. Both rulings exhibited a similarity: they were read in abstentia – Yingluck and Thaksin having fled abroad

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Published on October 11, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Top Constitutional Events Of 2014

  2014 was a landmark year for governments around the world. Here are some of the most important constitutional events of the past twelve months, brought to you by the Comparative Constitutions Project and Constitute.   Jan|Feb|Mar|May|Jun|Sept|Oct|Nov|Dec     January: Egypt Holds Constitutional Referendum On January 24, 2014, poll results showed that Egyptian voters approved

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Perverse Ruling from Thai Constitutional Court Extends Political Crisis

Thailand’s Constitutional Court has ruled that the Feb. 2 election was unconstitutional. This decision returns the country to its near-constant state of political crisis, which has become acute for the last several months, as Bangkok has been convulsing with demonstrations and counter-demonstrations. The anti-government forces had boycotted the February election, which would likely have resulted

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Published on March 21, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Thailand Update: The Search for Perfect Paper Continues

By Andrew Harding, Rawin Leelapatana, and Khemthong Tonsakulrungruang 1. Introduction In 1932 a coup d’etat abolished the absolute monarchy of Thailand and created a constitutional monarchy, for which it is obviously necessary to have a constitution. Since then, over a period of 81 years, Thailand has had 18 constitutions, the latest being the Constitution which

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