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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Term Limits"
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The Honduran Supreme Court Renders Inapplicable Unamendable Constitutional Provisions

–Leiv Marsteintredet, Associate Professor in Latin American Area Studies, University of Oslo; Associate Professor in Comparative Politics, University of Bergen In a unanimous judgment on April 22, 2015,[1] the Constitutional Chamber of the Honduran Supreme Court rendered inapplicable and without effect the unamendable provisions in the 1982 Honduran Constitution. These unamendable provisions prohibit presidential re-election and make

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Published on May 2, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Indonesian Constitutional Court in Crisis over the Chief Justice’s Term Limit

—Stefanus Hendrianto, Santa Clara University On January 12, 2015, the Indonesian Constitutional Court Justices unanimously elected Arief Hidayat, a lesser-known academic from Diponegoro University, as the new Chief Justice. After his inauguration, Hidayat stated that “the process [of election] was very smooth.” But before Hidayat took over the reign of Chief of Justice in a

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Published on February 5, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Legislative and Executive Term Limits in Alberta  

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School An important race is underway in Alberta, one of Canada’s ten provinces. In September, paid-up members of the Progressive Conservative Party will elect a new party leader, and the new leader will become the premier of Alberta. One of the candidates, Jim Prentice, a former federal Cabinet minister and

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Published on August 24, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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An Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendment in Trinidad & Tobago?

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Two days ago, the House of Representatives in Trinidad & Tobago passed the Constitution (Amendment) Bill, 2014 by a simple majority. The bill must still pass the Senate by a simple majority and receive presidential assent before becoming law, but neither step is expected to pose a threat to

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Published on August 14, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments