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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Socioeconomic Rights"
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Samuel Moyn in Bogotá: Not Enough and Domestic Constitutional Histories

—Jorge González-Jácome, Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá) The recent publication of Samuel Moyn’s Not Enough has triggered an important debate among human rights and international law scholars. The book focuses on the discussion about the relationship between the human rights revolution of the 1970s and the more or less simultaneous rise of neoliberalism and its

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Published on September 7, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Quo vadis, Inter-American Court? Activism, Backlash and Latin American Constitutionalism (I-CONnect Column)

—Francisca Pou Giménez, ITAM, Mexico City [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on April 11, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Working Well Is The Best Strategy: Judges under Populism

—Juan F. González-Bertomeu, ITAM (Mexico) [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Introduction: foes of all stripes Let’s start with this truism—no administration, populist or not, wants courts meddling with them and checking on their power. Administrations often

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Published on May 4, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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In Defense of Judicial Populism: Lessons From Colombia

—Jorge González-Jácome, Stanford University and Universidad de los Andes [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Introduction In 2005, the Colombian Constitutional Court upheld an amendment allowing presidential reelection. An extremely popular President elected for the 2002-2006 period,

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Published on May 3, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Misguided Judicialization of the Right to Education in Turkey

—Serkan Yolcu, Visiting Scholar, Boston College Law School On July 13, 2015 the Turkish Constitutional Court annulled — on a 12 to 5 vote — some provisions of a law amending the “Law on Private Teaching Institutions.” The law would have excluded “private tutoring centers” from the scope of “private teaching institutions” and thus closed

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Published on October 21, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Article Review: David Bilchitz on Matthias Klatt’s “Positive Rights: Who Decides? Judicial Review in Balance”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Article Review Series, David Bilchitz reviews Matthias Klatt‘s article on Positive Rights: Who Decides? Judicial Review in Balance, which appears in the current issue of I•CON. The full article is available for free here.] —David Bilchitz, University of Johannesburg In most constitutions today, fundamental rights play a central role and they are

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Published on August 26, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Judicial Activism and Forced Displacement: Lessons from the Colombian Paradox

—Cesar Rodríguez-Garavito, Universidad de los Andes and Dejusticia, and Diana Rodríguez-Franco, Northwestern University and Dejusticia Forced displacement affects millions of people in the world and entails a violation of basic human rights.  In many countries, given the lack of institutional capacity,  the main way of addressing this issue is through international human rights law  and

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Published on June 26, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Socioeconomic Rights and Constitutional Legitimacy in India

—Rehan Abeyratne, Jindal Global Law School In a forthcoming article, I examine socioeconomic rights in the Indian Constitution and the increasingly central role the Supreme Court plays in their enforcement. As Nilesh Sinha recently noted on this blog, India’s judicial independence has allowed the Court to secure broad socioeconomic justice, despite allegations of corruption and

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Published on April 11, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis