magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
Home Posts tagged "Quebec"
formats

I-CONnect Symposium: The Independence Vote in Catalonia–Sovereignty Referendums: Constitutionalism in Crisis?

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth entry in our symposium on Sunday’s independence vote in Catalonia. We are grateful to our convener, Professor Zoran Oklopcic, for assembling an outstanding group of scholars to bring our readers helpful context and analysis during this important moment for the region. The introduction to our symposium is available here.] —Stephen Tierney, Professor of

Read More…

Published on October 5, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Invitation to Friends of I-CONnect: Symposium on “Does Québec Need a Written Constitution?”

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Friends of I-CONnect are invited to attend a full-day symposium on “Does Québec Need a Written Constitution,” on Thursday, March 31, at Yale University. The program is structured around three panels and a keynote address by former Québec premier Jean Charest, whose cabinet considered codifying a constitution for the province. There

Read More…

Published on February 19, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Thresholds for Interpretation and Secession

—Adam Perry, Lecturer in Law, Queen Mary University of London Three of my favourite topics are statutory interpretation, Prince Charles, and Canadian electoral politics. I never thought these topics were all that closely related. Happily, I was wrong. For years Prince Charles has been writing letters to government ministers on everything from natural medicine to agricultural

Read More…

Published on September 2, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Taking Aim at Cooperative Federalism: The Long-Gun Registry Decision by the Supreme Court of Canada

—Johanne Poirier[*], Université libre de Bruxelles  On March 27, 2015, a highly divided Supreme Court of Canada rendered a momentous ruling which reveals a severe divergence on the nature of Canadian contemporary federalism.[1]  The tight 5 to 4 decision also underlines a different conception of the role of the judicial branch regarding the defence and promotion

Read More…

Published on April 15, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Cooperative Federalism Divides the Supreme Court of Canada: Quebec (Attorney General) v. Canada (Attorney General)

—Paul Daly, University of Montreal, Faculty of Law On Friday, the Supreme Court of Canada brought to an end the lengthy saga of Canada’s long-gun registry. There was a sharp split on the Court, with a bare majority of five justices giving a narrow win to the federal government over the joint dissent of their three

Read More…

Published on March 30, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Constitutionalizing Canada’s Supreme Court

—Robert Leckey, McGill University A dispute over the legality of a politically questionable judicial appointment has resulted in what pundits call a stinging defeat for Canada’s prime minister and a bold assertion by the Supreme Court of Canada of its independence and constitutional status. Last week, in Reference re Supreme Court Act, ss. 5 and

Read More…

Published on March 25, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments