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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Presidentialism"
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Navigating Constitution Building and Political Transitions in Sri Lanka

—Dian A H Shah, National University Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about

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Published on November 27, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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On the Protests and Riots in Chile: Why Chile Should Modify its Presidential System

—Sergio Verdugo, Centro de Justicia Constitucional, Universidad de Desarrollo (Chile)[1] There are many ways to approach the demands behind the protests in Chile, and I do not aim to replace or disprove those perspectives. Instead, this essay shows that part of the problem relates to the existence of an unresponsive government and that the explanation

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Published on October 29, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Party Fragmentation Paradox in Brazil: A Shield Against Authoritarianism?

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília and National Council for Scientific and Technological Development Brazil features possibly the most fragmented party system in the world. At this current legislative term, there are 25 parties with representation in the Lower House, and 16 in the Senate. The level of fragmentation is so steep that the biggest

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Published on October 24, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Constitutional Design and Post-Soviet Presidential Succession: The Kazakh Model?

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

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Published on May 1, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Indonesia’s Pesta Demokrasi in the Face of Regressing Constitutional Democracy

—Dian A H Shah, National University Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about

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Published on April 17, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Constitutional Chaos in Sri Lanka: Constitutional Retrogression or Working Out of its Constitutional Salvation?

—Jaclyn L. Neo, National University of Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about

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Published on November 29, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Presidentialism and the Crisis of Governance in Brazil

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth entry in our symposium on the “30th Anniversary of the Brazilian Constitution.” The introduction to the symposium is available here.] —Luiz Guilherme Arcaro Conci, Pontifical University of Sao Paulo Brazil was the only American country that, once independent (1822), established a national monarchy that reigned for almost eighty years[1]. From the late

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Published on October 14, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Indonesian Constitutional Court and the Crisis of the 2019 Presidential Election

–Stefanus Hendrianto, Boston College After many months of speculation, the candidates for the 2019 Indonesian presidential election announced their choice of running mates on August 9, 2018. The incumbent President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo, who ran on the platform of diversity and social equality, chose the 75-years-old conservative cleric Ma’ruf Amin as his running mate. Meanwhile,

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Published on September 19, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Oldest-Newest Separation of Powers

—Yaniv Roznai, Senior Lecturer, Radzyner Law School, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya. Separation of powers is a basic idea within constitutional theory. The principle of separation of powers, as famously described by Montesquieu in his The Spirit of the Laws, centered around three governmental branches: legislative power, executive power and judging power; a separation that was needed

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Published on May 23, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Distinguishing Among Referenda (I-CONnect Column)

—Aslı Bâli, UCLA School of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on April 27, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis