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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Populism" (Page 2)
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Working Well Is The Best Strategy: Judges under Populism

—Juan F. González-Bertomeu, ITAM (Mexico) [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Introduction: foes of all stripes Let’s start with this truism—no administration, populist or not, wants courts meddling with them and checking on their power. Administrations often

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Published on May 4, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populism and the Turkish Constitutional Court: the Game Broker, the Populist and the Popular

—Bertil Emrah Oder, Koç University Law School (Istanbul) [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Introduction Populist strategies have for some time been an integral part of Turkish political life employed dominantly by the right wing political parties.[1]

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Published on May 2, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populism and Judicial Backlash in the United States and Europe

—Bilyana Petkova, Postdoctoral fellow, NYU School of Law, Visiting Researcher, Yale [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. Parts of this post are adapted from “Federalism, Rights and Backlash”, International Journal of Constitutional Law (forthcoming, 2017), co-authored with

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Published on April 30, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Safeguarding Democratic Institutions

—Samuel Issacharoff, NYU School of Law [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] A discussion of courts and populism begs for definitional boundaries.  While courts are generally institutionally confined, the same cannot be said for populism, a

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Published on April 29, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Trapped in the Age of Trump: the American Supreme Court and 21st Century Populism

—Or Bassok, University of Nottingham [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. The author thanks Shay Levi for his valuable comments.] The American Supreme Court is currently ill-equipped to confront populism. The Court’s deficiency is not because of

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Published on April 28, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Courts in a Populist World

—Alon Harel, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] “I did not come to in order to be loved but in order to voice the sentiments of the public,” said Minister Miri

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Published on April 27, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populist Constitutionalism & The Democratic Minimum Core

—Rosalind Dixon, University of New South Wales [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Democratic “populism” is on the rise worldwide. In the last decade, Latin America has seen a wave of populist, neo-Bolivarian political change; Hungary

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Published on April 26, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populism and the Courts

—Andrew Arato, The New School [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] The antagonism of populist governments to apex courts is a matter of historical record, starting with Peronism, the first time that an openly populist movement

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Published on April 25, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populist Constitutions – A Contradiction in Terms?

—Jan-Werner Müller, Princeton University [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. Professor Müller’s post is adapted from his book What is Populism? (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) and from “Populism and Constitutionalism,” forthcoming in the Oxford Handbook of Populism.]

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Published on April 23, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Introduction: Constitutional Courts and Populism

—Michaela Hailbronner, University of Münster, Germany, and David Landau, Florida State University College of Law This mini-symposium is a joint project between the editors of the Verfassungsblog and the editors of I-Connect. We have brought together a number of prominent scholars, working on different issues, approaches, and regions of the world, and invite contributions by others,

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Published on April 22, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis