magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
Home Posts tagged "Populism"
formats

Brazilian Democratic Decay and the Fear of the People

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo & Fernando José Gonçalves Acunha, University of Brasília A recurring trend in comparative constitutional law is the emerging populism, which, in its various forms, extends to places and contexts as diverse as the United States, Poland, Turkey, Hungary, the Philippines, Latin America and so forth. Brazil, which is experiencing one of its

Read More…

Published on June 24, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Be Careful What You Wish For – A Short Comment on “Mandatory Voting as a Tool to Combat the New Populism”

–Ursus Eijkelenberg, International Institute for the Sociology of Law In a recent piece on ICONnect, the question was raised whether mandatory voting could be a potential “silver bullet” to dethrone autocratic populists. According to the authors, “new populist forces would face electoral defeat if the large number of generally disillusioned but politically fatigued and inactive voters

Read More…

Published on May 20, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Populist Constitutionalism

—Paul Blokker, Charles University in Prague [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Populist engagement with constitution-making and constitutional reform forms a distinctive, and in significant ways worrying, tendency. Populism is explicitly present in the constitutional politics of

Read More…

Published on May 4, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Working Well Is The Best Strategy: Judges under Populism

—Juan F. González-Bertomeu, ITAM (Mexico) [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Introduction: foes of all stripes Let’s start with this truism—no administration, populist or not, wants courts meddling with them and checking on their power. Administrations often

Read More…

Published on May 4, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Populism and the Turkish Constitutional Court: the Game Broker, the Populist and the Popular

—Bertil Emrah Oder, Koç University Law School (Istanbul) [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Introduction Populist strategies have for some time been an integral part of Turkish political life employed dominantly by the right wing political parties.[1]

Read More…

Published on May 2, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Populism and Judicial Backlash in the United States and Europe

—Bilyana Petkova, Postdoctoral fellow, NYU School of Law, Visiting Researcher, Yale [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. Parts of this post are adapted from “Federalism, Rights and Backlash”, International Journal of Constitutional Law (forthcoming, 2017), co-authored with

Read More…

Published on April 30, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Safeguarding Democratic Institutions

—Samuel Issacharoff, NYU School of Law [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] A discussion of courts and populism begs for definitional boundaries.  While courts are generally institutionally confined, the same cannot be said for populism, a

Read More…

Published on April 29, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Trapped in the Age of Trump: the American Supreme Court and 21st Century Populism

—Or Bassok, University of Nottingham [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. The author thanks Shay Levi for his valuable comments.] The American Supreme Court is currently ill-equipped to confront populism. The Court’s deficiency is not because of

Read More…

Published on April 28, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Courts in a Populist World

—Alon Harel, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] “I did not come to in order to be loved but in order to voice the sentiments of the public,” said Minister Miri

Read More…

Published on April 27, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Populist Constitutionalism & The Democratic Minimum Core

—Rosalind Dixon, University of New South Wales [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Democratic “populism” is on the rise worldwide. In the last decade, Latin America has seen a wave of populist, neo-Bolivarian political change; Hungary

Read More…

Published on April 26, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis