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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Poland"
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Symposium | Part IV | After the decision of the captured Polish Constitutional Tribunal: jurists trying to have and eat their cake

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the recent decision by the Polish Constitutional Tribunal on the primacy of EU law. This is the fifth entry of the symposium, which was kindly organized by Antonia Baraggia and Giada Ragone. Their introduction is available here]. —Maciej Krogel, European University Institute The decision of the

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Published on October 17, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium | Part III | Let’s take a deep breath: on the EU (and academic) reaction to the Polish Constitutional Tribunal’s ruling

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the recent decision by the Polish Constitutional Tribunal on the primacy of EU law. This is the fourth entry of the symposium, which was kindly organized by Antonia Baraggia and Giada Ragone. Their introduction is available here]. —Matteo Bonelli, Maastricht University Breath in, breath out. Yes,

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Published on October 17, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium | Part II | From Constitutional Pluralism to Constitutional Solipsism

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the recent decision by the Polish Constitutional Tribunal on the primacy of EU law. This is the third entry of the symposium, which was kindly organized by Antonia Baraggia and Giada Ragone. Their introduction is available here]. —Julian Scholtes, Newcastle University On Thursday, 7 October 2021,

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Published on October 16, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium | Part I | How to unfriend the EU in Poland

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the recent decision by the Polish Constitutional Tribunal on the primacy of EU law. This is the second entry of the symposium, which was kindly organized by Antonia Baraggia and Giada Ragone. Their introduction is available here]. —Agnieszka Bień-Kacała, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń (Poland) More

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Published on October 16, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium | Introduction | The Polish Constitutional Tribunal Decision on the Primacy of EU Law: Alea Iacta Est. Now what?

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a symposium on the recent decision by the Polish Constitutional Tribunal on the primacy of EU law. This introduction will be followed by four posts exploring different aspects of the decision and its impact.] —Antonia Baraggia and Giada Ragone, University of Milan, Italy On October 7, 2021 the

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Published on October 15, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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JHH Weiler, Co-Editor in Chief, in Conversation with Professor Wojciech Sadurski

—J.H.H. Weiler, Co-Editor in Chief, ICON, and Wojciech Sadurski, University of Sydney One of the more ‘elegant’ ways of restricting freedom of political speech and academic freedom is to use libel and defamation laws. It has increasingly become the weapon of choice of various political actors and regimes. Nobody would gainsay that academics may libel

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Published on December 13, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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The Rule of Law and the Judicial Retirement Age in Poland: Is the ECJ Judgment the End of the Story?

—Matteo Mastracci, Koç University On June 24, 2019, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Justice delivered its long hoped for judgment over the retirement age dispute introduced by the Polish legislator through the so-called “Law on the Supreme Court.” Following the passage of this law, all sitting judges were forced to retire early

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Published on July 19, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Can International Organisations Help to Stem Democratic Decay? (I-CONnect Column)

—Tom Gerald Daly, Fellow, Melbourne Law School; Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For

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Published on November 16, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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When is a Limp More than a Limp? Diagnosing Democratic Decay

—Tom Gerald Daly, Fellow, Melbourne Law School; Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law Sometimes a limp is just a limp–arising from a debilitating yet isolated injury or infection that will soon heal. However, sometimes a limp can be indicative of a degenerative disease such as multiple sclerosis. Gaining a clear diagnosis and prognosis of

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Published on July 12, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Be Careful What You Wish For – A Short Comment on “Mandatory Voting as a Tool to Combat the New Populism”

–Ursus Eijkelenberg, International Institute for the Sociology of Law In a recent piece on ICONnect, the question was raised whether mandatory voting could be a potential “silver bullet” to dethrone autocratic populists. According to the authors, “new populist forces would face electoral defeat if the large number of generally disillusioned but politically fatigued and inactive voters

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Published on May 20, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis