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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Part V"
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150 Years On: What is the Constitution of Canada?–Part 3 of 3–A Doctrinal Approach to the Problem of Identification

Editor’s Note: This is the third post in a three-part series to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation in Canada. In their three posts, Maxime St-Hilaire, Patrick Baud and Éléna S. Drouin offer critical reflections on a provocative question: What is the Constitution of Canada? Their first post is available here and their second here. ––Maxime St-Hilaire,

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Published on September 14, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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150 Years On: What is the Constitution of Canada?–Part 2 of 3–Amending the Supreme Law

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in a three-part series to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation in Canada. In three separate posts, Maxime St-Hilaire, Patrick Baud and Éléna S. Drouin offer critical reflections on a provocative question: What is the Constitution of Canada? Their first post is available here. —Maxime St-Hilaire, Université de Sherbrooke; Patrick

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Published on September 13, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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150 Years On: What is the Constitution of Canada?–Part 1 of 3–The Problem of Identification

Editor’s Note: Today we begin a three-day series to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation in Canada. In three separate posts, Maxime St-Hilaire, Patrick Baud and Éléna S. Drouin offer critical reflections on a provocative question: What is the Constitution of Canada? We thank them for sharing their views in this forum. —Maxime St-Hilaire, Université de

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Published on September 12, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Virtual Bookshelf: Understanding Constitutional Change in Canada–A Review of “Constitutional Amendment in Canada,” Edited by Emmett Macfarlane

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In his influential though dated study of formal amendment difficulty, Donald Lutz examines the amending procedures for 32 countries and concludes that the United States Constitution is the most difficult to amend.[1] Notwithstanding the all-important questions raised by Tom Ginsburg and James Melton–whether and how much the amending rule matters

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Published on September 21, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Reviews