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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Pakistan Supreme Court"
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Losing the Battle to Win the War: Judicial Self-Empowerment Through Maxi-Minimalism

—Yvonne Tew, Georgetown University Law Center[1] [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. For more information about our four columnists for 2020, please click here.] On September 26, 2020, President Donald Trump announced Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the United States Supreme Court to fill the seat occupied by

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Published on October 7, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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To Convict a Dictator: Judges Versus Generals in Pakistan

—Yasser Kureshi, Senior Teaching Fellow, SOAS University of London On the 17th of December 2019, a special court in Pakistan found its former military dictator, General Musharraf (1999-2008), guilty of high treason for suspending the constitution in 2007.[1] In a country where the military has ruled with impunity for much of its history, this verdict

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Published on December 28, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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District Bar Association, Rawalpindi v. Federation of Pakistan: Marbury-Style Judicial Empowerment?

—Neil Modi, Visiting Researcher, Georgetown University Law Center The Pakistani Supreme Court’s decision in District Bar Association, Rawalpindi v. Federation of Pakistan (2015) serves as a good illustration of an attempt of judicial self-empowerment, akin to a Marbury v. Madison-style moment.[1] By this I mean that the strategy adopted by the court in this case

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Published on December 1, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis