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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Mexican constitution"
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Playing the Long Game: Behind Mexico’s Presidential Recall Election

—Mariana Velasco-Rivera, National University of Ireland Maynooth, School of Law and Criminology; Co-Editor, IACL Blog. Twitter: @marisconsin. [Editor’s Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our 2022 columnists, see here.] In my last column I tried to bring attention to the way in which Mexico’s ruling party (MORENA) hijacked the presidential

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Published on April 13, 2022
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Mexico’s Upcoming Presidential Recall Election has been Hijacked by the President’s Party

—Mariana Velasco-Rivera, National University of Ireland Maynooth, School of Law and Criminology; Co-Editor, IACL Blog. Twitter: @marisconsin. [Editor’s Note: This is one of our regular ICONnect columns.] In recent years, a series of constitutional amendments have introduced mechanisms of direct democracy in Mexico—in particular, referendums (2012) and Presidential recall elections (2019). The first referendum in

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Published on February 9, 2022
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Decriminalization of Abortion: A Landmark Decision by the Mexican Supreme Court

—Joy Monserrat Ochoa Martínez, UNAM and the Mexican Supreme Court, and Roberto Niembro Ortega, Universidad Iberoamericana and the Mexican Supreme Court; co-Chair, ICON-S Mexico Several weeks ago, the Supreme Court issued a landmark judgment recognizing a right to voluntary abortion during the first trimester of pregnancy. The ruling renders several articles of the criminal code

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Published on October 12, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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On the Possible Legal and Political Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic in México

—Andrea Pozas-Loyo, Legal Research Institute (IIJ), National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) Mexico is in the midst of a legal and political storm in which events unfold at an accelerated pace, where the prevalent perception is that of uncertainty in an increasingly polarized public arena. In what follows, I will use the concept of “critical

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Published on June 25, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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López Obrador’s Fourth Transformation of Mexico: Four Areas of Scholarly Inquiry

[Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2018, see here.] —Francisca Pou Giménez, ITAM,

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Published on October 24, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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A Way Out of Hyper-Reformism? A Project of Constitutional Reorganization and Consolidation in Mexico

—Andrea Pozas-Loyo, IIJ-UNAM Mexico has one of the world’s oldest and most amended constitutions: its 99-year old constitution has been amended 642 times. De jure, Mexico’s constitution is pretty rigid: amendments require three-quarters of the present members of congress and approval of the majority of the states’ legislatures. During the hegemonic-party period, the PRI had

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Published on March 2, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis