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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "judicial review"
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Special Undergraduate Series–COVID-19: The Indian Supreme Court’s Abdication of Constitutional Duty

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law StudentsLL.B. Student Contribution —Prannv Dhawan, National Law School of India University, and Anmol Jain, National Law University, Jodhpur Judicial restraint is necessary in dealing with the powers of another co-ordinate bench of the government; but restraint cannot imply abdication of the responsibility of walking on that edge. —Supreme Court

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Published on May 23, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Hercules Leaves (But Does Not Abandon) the Forum of Principle: Courts, Judicial Review, and COVID-19

—Vicente F. Benítez R., JSD candidate at NYU School of Law and Constitutional Law Professor at Universidad de La Sabana* Introduction Several analysts have warned about the sudden concentration of power in the hands of chief executives in the wake of the COVID-19 situation. From the Americas to Africa, and from Europe to Asia, we

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Published on May 8, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Towards an Anti-Bully Theory of Judicial Review

—Yaniv Roznai, Harry Radzyner Law School, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya * In an environment of democratic erosion, courts are under political pressure. Populist projects of constitutional change modify the rules for appointment and jurisdiction of bodies like constitutional courts in an attempt to weaken their independence, pack them and even capture them. Often, courts are

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Published on December 21, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Late Soviet Constitutional Supervision: A Model for Central Asian Constitutional Review?

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

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Published on October 2, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Russia’s Contested Constitutional Review

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

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Published on February 13, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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I-CONnect Symposium: The 70th Anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court—The Evolution of Proportionality in Taiwan Constitutional Jurisprudence

[Editor’s Note: This is Part III of our I-CONnect symposium on the 70th anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court. We are grateful to our guest editor, Professor Chien-Chih Lin, for convening this group of contributors and bringing this symposium to our readers. The Introduction is available here, Part I is available here, and Part II is

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Published on December 14, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Introduction to I-CONnect Symposium: The 70th Anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a one-week symposium on the 70th anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court. We are grateful to our guest editor, Professor Chien-Chih Lin, for convening this group of contributors and bringing this symposium to our readers.] –Chien-Chih Lin, Assistant Research Professor, Institutum Iurisprudentiae, Academia Sinica Established in 1948, the Taiwan Constitutional

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Published on December 11, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Rise of Comparative Constitutional Change — Book Review: Reijer Passchier and Alissa Verhagen on “The Foundations and Traditions of Constitutional Amendment”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Reijer Passchier and Alissa Verhagen review The Foundations and Traditions of Constitutional Amendment (Hart 2017), edited by Richard Albert, Xenophon Contiades and Alkmene Fotiadou] –Reijer Passchier[*] and Alissa Verhagen[**] I. The renaissance of an issue The matter of constitutional change is one of the most difficult and challenging issues

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Published on April 4, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Richard Albert
 
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Virtual Bookshelf: A Review of “Constitutional Dialogue in Common Law Asia” by Po Jen Yap

—Richard Albert, The University of Texas at Austin The concept of constitutional “dialogue” has become prevalent in public law scholarship. The term is commonly used to describe one particular form of interaction between courts and legislatures in connection with the interpretation of constitutional rights–an interaction characterized by a judicial-legislative exchange on the proper outcome rather

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Published on February 9, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Crosspost: Is the GOP Tax Law Unconstitutional?

[Editor’s Note: This piece originally appeared here in the San Francisco Chronicle on December 21, 2017.] —Stephen Gardbaum, UCLA School of Law; Member of the ICON-S Governing Council Now that the Republican tax bill is law, is the matter settled, at least until November or, more likely, 2020? Not necessarily, because the courts may yet

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Published on January 2, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis