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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "judicial review"
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Shortcuts and Short Circuits in Latin American Constitutional Models: a Reading of Cristina Lafont’s Democracy without Shortcuts

—Julian Gaviria-Mira, Universidad EAFIT, Colombia In Democracy without Shortcuts, the philosopher Cristina Lafont has elaborated a compelling defense of what she calls a “deliberative-participatory democracy”. This democracy “without shortcuts” seeks to vindicate, at the same time, both deliberation in democratic institutions and strong participation of the citizens in collective self-government. Curiously, the effort to delineate

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Published on September 30, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Taking Constitutional Statecraft Beyond the Courts – a Book Review of Yvonne Tew’s “Constitutional Statecraft in Asian Courts”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Ming-Sung Kuo reviews Yvonne Tew’s book on Constitutional Statecraft in Asian Courts (Oxford University Press, 2020)] — Ming-Sung Kuo, Associate Professor, University of Warwick, UK National experiences in Asia have abundantly enriched the gene pool of comparative constitutional law thanks to great efforts of scholars from

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Published on May 7, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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The Colombian Model of Judicial Review of Legislation: A Predecessor to the Austrian Constitutional Court of 1920

—Mario Alberto Cajas Sarria, Universidad Icesi, Colombia[1] It is 100 years since the creation of the Austrian Constitutional Court (October, 1920), which gave rise to the “Austrian Model” of judicial review of a concentrated and specialized Constitutional Court,[2] that spread across Europe with its adaptations and migrated to other continents[3]. On this Centenary, it is

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Published on November 19, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Special Undergraduate Series–COVID-19: The Indian Supreme Court’s Abdication of Constitutional Duty

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law StudentsLL.B. Student Contribution —Prannv Dhawan, National Law School of India University, and Anmol Jain, National Law University, Jodhpur Judicial restraint is necessary in dealing with the powers of another co-ordinate bench of the government; but restraint cannot imply abdication of the responsibility of walking on that edge. —Supreme Court

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Published on May 23, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Hercules Leaves (But Does Not Abandon) the Forum of Principle: Courts, Judicial Review, and COVID-19

—Vicente F. Benítez R., JSD candidate at NYU School of Law and Constitutional Law Professor at Universidad de La Sabana* Introduction Several analysts have warned about the sudden concentration of power in the hands of chief executives in the wake of the COVID-19 situation. From the Americas to Africa, and from Europe to Asia, we

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Published on May 8, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Towards an Anti-Bully Theory of Judicial Review

—Yaniv Roznai, Harry Radzyner Law School, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya * In an environment of democratic erosion, courts are under political pressure. Populist projects of constitutional change modify the rules for appointment and jurisdiction of bodies like constitutional courts in an attempt to weaken their independence, pack them and even capture them. Often, courts are

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Published on December 21, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Late Soviet Constitutional Supervision: A Model for Central Asian Constitutional Review?

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

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Published on October 2, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Russia’s Contested Constitutional Review

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

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Published on February 13, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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I-CONnect Symposium: The 70th Anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court—The Evolution of Proportionality in Taiwan Constitutional Jurisprudence

[Editor’s Note: This is Part III of our I-CONnect symposium on the 70th anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court. We are grateful to our guest editor, Professor Chien-Chih Lin, for convening this group of contributors and bringing this symposium to our readers. The Introduction is available here, Part I is available here, and Part II is

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Published on December 14, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Introduction to I-CONnect Symposium: The 70th Anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a one-week symposium on the 70th anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court. We are grateful to our guest editor, Professor Chien-Chih Lin, for convening this group of contributors and bringing this symposium to our readers.] –Chien-Chih Lin, Assistant Research Professor, Institutum Iurisprudentiae, Academia Sinica Established in 1948, the Taiwan Constitutional

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Published on December 11, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments