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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "judicial review"
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I-CONnect Symposium: The 70th Anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court—The Evolution of Proportionality in Taiwan Constitutional Jurisprudence

[Editor’s Note: This is Part III of our I-CONnect symposium on the 70th anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court. We are grateful to our guest editor, Professor Chien-Chih Lin, for convening this group of contributors and bringing this symposium to our readers. The Introduction is available here, Part I is available here, and Part II is

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Published on December 14, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Introduction to I-CONnect Symposium: The 70th Anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a one-week symposium on the 70th anniversary of the Taiwan Constitutional Court. We are grateful to our guest editor, Professor Chien-Chih Lin, for convening this group of contributors and bringing this symposium to our readers.] –Chien-Chih Lin, Assistant Research Professor, Institutum Iurisprudentiae, Academia Sinica Established in 1948, the Taiwan Constitutional

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Published on December 11, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Rise of Comparative Constitutional Change — Book Review: Reijer Passchier and Alissa Verhagen on “The Foundations and Traditions of Constitutional Amendment”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Reijer Passchier and Alissa Verhagen review The Foundations and Traditions of Constitutional Amendment (Hart 2017), edited by Richard Albert, Xenophon Contiades and Alkmene Fotiadou] –Reijer Passchier[*] and Alissa Verhagen[**] I. The renaissance of an issue The matter of constitutional change is one of the most difficult and challenging issues

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Published on April 4, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Richard Albert
 
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Virtual Bookshelf: A Review of “Constitutional Dialogue in Common Law Asia” by Po Jen Yap

—Richard Albert, The University of Texas at Austin The concept of constitutional “dialogue” has become prevalent in public law scholarship. The term is commonly used to describe one particular form of interaction between courts and legislatures in connection with the interpretation of constitutional rights–an interaction characterized by a judicial-legislative exchange on the proper outcome rather

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Published on February 9, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Crosspost: Is the GOP Tax Law Unconstitutional?

[Editor’s Note: This piece originally appeared here in the San Francisco Chronicle on December 21, 2017.] —Stephen Gardbaum, UCLA School of Law; Member of the ICON-S Governing Council Now that the Republican tax bill is law, is the matter settled, at least until November or, more likely, 2020? Not necessarily, because the courts may yet

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Published on January 2, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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In Wake of Controversial Enactment Process of Trump’s Tax Bill, Israeli SC Offers a Novel Approach to Regulating Omnibus Legislation

—Ittai Bar-Siman-Tov, Assistant Professor, Bar Ilan University Faculty of Law A controversial tax reform is enacted in the middle of the night. It is enacted in a massive hundreds-of-pages omnibus bill, which is rammed through the legislative process in a highly accelerated pace. The legislators receive the final version of the bill in the very last

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Published on December 13, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Working Well Is The Best Strategy: Judges under Populism

—Juan F. González-Bertomeu, ITAM (Mexico) [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Introduction: foes of all stripes Let’s start with this truism—no administration, populist or not, wants courts meddling with them and checking on their power. Administrations often

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Published on May 4, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populism and Judicial Backlash in the United States and Europe

—Bilyana Petkova, Postdoctoral fellow, NYU School of Law, Visiting Researcher, Yale [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. Parts of this post are adapted from “Federalism, Rights and Backlash”, International Journal of Constitutional Law (forthcoming, 2017), co-authored with

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Published on April 30, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Safeguarding Democratic Institutions

—Samuel Issacharoff, NYU School of Law [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] A discussion of courts and populism begs for definitional boundaries.  While courts are generally institutionally confined, the same cannot be said for populism, a

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Published on April 29, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populism and the Courts

—Andrew Arato, The New School [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] The antagonism of populist governments to apex courts is a matter of historical record, starting with Peronism, the first time that an openly populist movement

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Published on April 25, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis