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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Judicial Reform"
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Challenges for the Constitutional Court and Democracy in Albania

–Prof. Dr. Aurela Anastasi, Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Tirana; Fulbright Research Scholar, Boston College Law School The justice system in Albania is going through a major reform to ensure the independence of the judicial system. The constitutional amendment adopted by the Parliament in 2016 established various measures and created several new institutions aimed at combating corruption

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Published on May 9, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Book Review: Raul A. Sanchez-Urribarri on David Kosař’s “Perils of Judicial Self-Government in Transitional Societies”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Raul A. Sanchez-Urribarri reviews David Kosař’s book on Perils of Judicial Self-Government in Transitional Societies (Cambridge 2016)] –Raul A. Sanchez-Urribarri, Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Legal Studies, La Trobe University One of the key ideals driving judicial reform agendas is judicial independence.  Countless resources have been dedicated to safeguarding judges’

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Published on July 27, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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The Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendment Doctrine and the Reform of the Judiciary in Colombia

—Mario Cajas Sarria, Icesi University, Colombia In the past few months, the Colombian Constitutional Court surprised the government, citizens, and legal scholars by issuing two decisions which struck down two bodies created by legislative act 1 of 2015, a constitutional reform that aimed at a broad constitutional overhaul of the separation of powers. The Court

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Published on September 1, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Will Democracy and Constitutionalism Mix in Myanmar?

—Dominic J Nardi, Jr, University of Michigan Department of Political Science Myanmar’s[1] constitution – adopted after a controversial referendum in May 2008 – created the country’s first constitutional court in half a century. Initially, few if any observers believed the Constitutional Tribunal would play a significant role. However, within a few months, the tribunal seemed to be

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Published on October 24, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Developments