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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "International Law"
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The Supreme Court of Chile as an Inter-American Tribunal

–Jorge Contesse, Assistant Professor of Law, Rutgers Law School The Grand Chamber of Chile’s Supreme Court recently declared that criminal convictions against indigenous leaders obtained under Chile’s terrorist statute “have ceased to have effects,” as direct result of a decision by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.[1]  In 2014, the Inter-American Court found that the

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Published on June 1, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Politics behind the Latest Advisory Opinions of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

—Nicolás Carrillo-Santarelli, Universidad de la Sabana, Colombia[1] The Inter-American Court of Human Rights (hereinafter, IACtHR) recently made public the text of its two latest advisory opinions, In OC-24/17 the Court was of the opinion that the change of name and identity documents ought to be consistent with the self-perceived gender identities, reason why individuals should

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Published on February 24, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Superficiality of U.S. Confirmation Hearings and the Issue of Comparative Constitutional Law

—Stefanus Hendrianto, Boston College In the last five confirmation hearings in the United States Senate for nominees to the U.S. Supreme Court (Roberts, 2005; Alito, 2006; Sotomayor, 2009; Kagan, 2010; and Gorsuch, 2017), the role of comparative constitutional law in the American constitutional system was one of the main questions. Very recently, in the confirmation

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Published on September 21, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Greek Austerity Measures: Remedies Under International Law

— George Katrougalos, Professor of Public Law, Demokritus University, Greece (gkatr@otenet.gr) In a prior post, I argued that the Greek austerity measures violated various provisions of the Greek Constitution, as well as treaty commitments and other instruments embodied in international law. In this post I consider a related question: What are the legal remedies that

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Published on January 30, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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International Arbitration and the Transformation of Comparative Law

—Donald Childress III, Pepperdine University We are in the midst of a monumental shift in the way international law views the state.  While at one time, the nation-state claimed near absolute authority over prescribing, adjudicating, and enforcing law, today we see many non-state actors competing for legal competence.  The historical idea, encapsulated in the PCIJ’s

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Published on January 12, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis