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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Inter-American Court of Human Rights"
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I-CONnect Symposium–The Chilean Constitutional Court’s Abortion Decision–Finding and Losing Women in Abortion Law Reform: The Case of the Chilean Constitutional Decision on Law 21030

[Editor’s Note: This is Part IV in our symposium on the one-year anniversary of the Chilean Constitutional Court’s abortion decision. The Introduction to the symposium is available here, Part I is available here, Part II is available here, and Part III is available here.] —Isabel C. Jaramillo Sierra, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá In August 2017, the Chilean Constitutional Tribunal

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Published on August 4, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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I-CONnect Symposium–The Chilean Constitutional Court’s Abortion Decision: Door Opened and Left Ajar

[Editor’s Note: This is Part I in our symposium on the one-year anniversary of the Chilean Constitutional Court’s abortion decision. The Introduction to the symposium is available here.] —Blanca Rodriguez-Ruiz, University of Seville The recent decriminalisation of abortion in Chile is indeed to be welcomed, yet it stands as a case of too little, too late. It has

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Published on August 1, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Quo vadis, Inter-American Court? Activism, Backlash and Latin American Constitutionalism (I-CONnect Column)

—Francisca Pou Giménez, ITAM, Mexico City [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on April 11, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Politics behind the Latest Advisory Opinions of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

—Nicolás Carrillo-Santarelli, Universidad de la Sabana, Colombia[1] The Inter-American Court of Human Rights (hereinafter, IACtHR) recently made public the text of its two latest advisory opinions, In OC-24/17 the Court was of the opinion that the change of name and identity documents ought to be consistent with the self-perceived gender identities, reason why individuals should

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Published on February 24, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Crisis and its Opposite: A Reminiscence of Same-Sex Marriage’s Most Successful Year (I-CONnect Column)

—James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists

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Published on January 31, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Judicial Backlash in Inter-American Human Rights Law?

—Jorge Contesse, Assistant Professor of Law, Rutgers Law School Argentina has one of the strongest monist constitutional practices in Latin America—a region where incorporation of international human rights law into domestic constitutional arrangements is already the norm.  In 1994, its legislature granted constitutional status to a number of international human treaties.  A decade later, relying

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Published on March 2, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Symposium on the Constitutionalization of International Law in Latin America

Editor’s Note: We are pleased to be promote this AJIL Unbound Symposium on the Constitutionalization of International Law in Latin America. AJIL Unbound is the online scholarly companion to the American Journal of International Law. This Symposium, including a thematic introduction and four essays, addresses a subject of interest to scholars of public law and we are delighted to

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Published on November 11, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Constitutional Stability Through Citizenship in the Dominican Republic

—Jillian Blake, University of Michigan In a 2010 article, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez describes “Wiki-constitutionalism”—a phenomenon common to Latin American legal systems in which national constitutions are “changed with great frequency and unusual ease.”[1] The Dominican Republic’s system is a stark example of Wiki-constitutionalism; the country has had more than 30 constitutions since achieving independence in 1844.[2]

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Published on September 5, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis