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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Impeachment"
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Militant Democracy in America

—Miguel Schor, Drake University Law School Comparative constitutionalism, long a backwater among American constitutionalists, is enjoying a resurgence as scholars seek to better understand Trumpism and what it might portend for American democracy. The term autogolpe began to trend when a mob attacked the Capitol after Trump, who knows little about Henry II or Thomas

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Published on February 16, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium on The Legacies of Trumpism and Constitutional Democracy in the United States | Part II | The Dilemma of Democratic Disqualification: The New Trump Impeachment Process in Comparative Perspective

[Editor’s Note: In light of this week’s inauguration, I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the state of US constitutionalism after Trump. The introduction to the symposium can be found here.] —Aziz Huq, University of Chicago Law School; David Landau, Florida State University College of Law; and Tom Ginsburg, University of Chicago Law

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Published on January 21, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium on The Legacies of Trumpism and Constitutional Democracy in the United States | Part I | Can it Happen–Is It Happening Here?

[Editor’s Note: In light of this week’s inauguration, I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the state of US constitutionalism after Trump. The introduction to the symposium can be found here.] —Andrea Scoseria Katz, Washington University School of Law Blaring on the TV as this post is being finalized is the U.S. House

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Published on January 20, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium | Introduction | The Legacies of Trumpism and Constitutional Democracy in the United States

[Editor’s Note: In light of this week’s inauguration, I-CONnect is pleased to feature a symposium on the state of US constitutionalism after Trump. This introduction will be followed by five posts exploring different aspects of the U.S.’s constitutional democracy in comparative perspective.] —David Landau, Florida State University College of Law, and Miguel Schor, Drake University Law

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Published on January 19, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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High Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Surprising Rarity of the US Impeachment Standard

—Alexander Hudson, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. For more information about our four columnists for 2020, please click here.] As the attention of many observers of law and politics is fixed on the impeachment process now underway in the United States

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Published on January 29, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case”–Intermezzo to the Constitutional Conflict in Slovakia: A Case Critique

[Editor’s Note: This is the second of five parts in our symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case.” The introduction to the symposium is available here.] —Simon Drugda, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford On December 6 the first Senate of the Slovak Constitutional Court (CC) held that President Andrej Kiska infringed rights of the

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Published on January 24, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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“Constitutional Dismemberment” and Political Crisis in Brazil: Populism in Sight?

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília Jon Elster once wrote that “… the task of constitution-making generally emerges in conditions that are likely to work against good constitution-making.”[1] Passion – as he puts it – prevails over reason in such turbulent circumstances. When it comes to other forms of substantial constitutional change, such as what

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Published on May 6, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Is There an Optimal Constitutional Design for Presidential Impeachments?

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília Comparative constitutional law is now faced with a rich debate over the scope, limits, and consequences of impeachment proceedings. Since the Brazilian President Dilma Roussef was temporarily suspended from office and thereby replaced by the acting President Michel Temer after the Senate had voted to begin an impeachment trial

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Published on June 22, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Abusive Impeachment? Brazilian Political Turmoil and the Judicialization of Mega-Politics

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília In 2007, Aníbal Pérez-Liñán, an Argentinian professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh, wrote that “impeachments are likely when the mass media systematically investigate and expose political scandals and when the president fails to keep tight control over Congress… When a broad social coalition takes the street

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Published on April 23, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Institutions Matter: The Brazilian Supreme Court’s Decision on Impeachment

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasilia Judicial review of the legislative process is certainly one of the mo­­st sensitive areas of the relationship between the Judiciary and Parliament. In comparative law, there is no clear trend. In the United States, the enrolled bill doctrine, which claims that courts are required to accept that “a bill

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Published on December 31, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments