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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Hungary"
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Book Review: Andrew Roberts on Anna Fruhstorfer and Michael Hein’s “Constitutional Politics in Central and Eastern Europe: From Post-Socialist Transition to the Reform of Political Systems”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Andrew Roberts reviews Anna Fruhstorfer and Michael Hein’s book on Constitutional Politics in Central and Eastern Europe: From Post-Socialist Transition to the Reform of Political Systems (Springer 2016)] —Andrew Roberts, Northwestern University The fall of communism gave rise to a wave of theorizing about constitutionalism. Western experts

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Published on July 21, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Be Careful What You Wish For – A Short Comment on “Mandatory Voting as a Tool to Combat the New Populism”

–Ursus Eijkelenberg, International Institute for the Sociology of Law In a recent piece on ICONnect, the question was raised whether mandatory voting could be a potential “silver bullet” to dethrone autocratic populists. According to the authors, “new populist forces would face electoral defeat if the large number of generally disillusioned but politically fatigued and inactive voters

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Published on May 20, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Mandatory Voting as a Tool to Combat the “New Populism”

—András László Pap, Research Chair, Hungarian Academy of Sciences Centre for Social Sciences Institute for Legal Studies; SASPRO-Marie-Curie Fellow, Slovak Academy of Sciences Institute for Sociology; Recurrent Visiting (Adjunct) Professor, Central European University; Professor, National University of Public Service, Budapest, and Anna Śledzińska-Simon, Assistant Professor, University of Wrocław   The Hungarian and Polish experience of constitutional capture

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Published on April 19, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Return of the Sovereign: A Look at the Rule of Law in Hungary – and in Europe

—Renata Uitz, Central European University [Cross-posted from, and initially published on, Verfassungsblog] Spring arrived in Budapest with sunshine, magnolias in full bloom, hordes of stag partiers from the U.K. – and a sovereign ready to fight against foreign invaders by legal means. After a lengthy media and political campaign against migrants, foreign influence and George

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Published on April 5, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Of the Politics of Resentment and European Disintegration: Are the European Peoples Ready to Keep Paddling Together? Part I

—Tomasz Tadeusz Koncewicz, Professor of Law and Director of the Department of European and Comparative Law at the University of Gdańsk, Poland* The Politics of Resentment. What is in a Name? It is trite to say that today “resentment” sweeps across Europe. Yet beyond this sweeping statement, the concept itself, its consequences and modus operandi, are

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Published on February 26, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Attacks on Courts: Taking Wider Lessons from Recent Irish Supreme Court Revelations

—Tom Gerald Daly, Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law The past week has seen the launch of an unprecedented book detailing the inner workings of the Supreme Court of Ireland, which provides potentially useful general insights into how courts deal with political attacks.[1] The new book, by a leading journalist, Ruadhán Mac Cormaic, has laid

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Published on September 8, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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The Internet Tax Debate: Genuine Freedom of Assembly vs. the Illusion of Direct Democracy in Hungary

—Zoltán Pozsár-Szentmiklósy, ELTE University, Budapest On October 21, 2014, Hungarian government officials announced that in the 2015 state budget they would include a tax on internet data transfer. This so-called internet tax was widely criticized in the media and in civil society. A rapidly growing protest movement was organized on Facebook and a demonstration took

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Published on November 19, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Should the Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendments Doctrine be Part of the Canon?

—David Landau, Florida State University College of Law The concept of substantively unconstitutional constitutional amendments, for example in the Indian “basic structure” doctrine, presents one of the strangest puzzles in comparative constitutional law. It raises obvious and substantial problems from the standpoint of democratic theory, raising a kind of ultimate counter-majoritarian difficulty. The court using

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Published on June 10, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis