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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Human rights"
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Human Rights in Africa in the Context of Covid-19

–Sean Molloy, Research Associate, Newcastle Law School, Newcastle University In response to Covid-19, countries across Africa are declaring a state of emergency (these include Botswana, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Botswana, Ethiopia and Senegal, to name a few). Doing so allows the authorities, in times of urgent necessity, to take actions necessary to safeguard national security, maintain

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Published on May 1, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Joint Declaration to the Inter-American System of Human Rights: Backlash or Contestation?

—Melina Girardi Fachin (Universidade Federal do Paraná); Bruna Nowak (Universidade Federal do Paraná) In April 2019, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Paraguay issued a joint declaration to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights with critical observations directed to the Inter-American System of Human Rights. The states reaffirmed their commitment to the American Convention on Human

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Published on December 12, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Book Review: Catarina Santos Botelho on Sabino Cassese’s “A World Government?”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Catarina Santos Botelho reviews Sabino Cassese’s book on A World Government? (Global Law Press/Editorial Derecho Global, Sevilla, 2018). –Catarina Santos Botelho, Catholic University of Portugal When opening Sabino Cassese’s book, one expects to find an open-minded and thought-provoking writing, with strong normative propositions and theoretical clarity. This fascinating

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Published on July 30, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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I–CONnect Symposium: The 30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea—Part III: The Constitutional Court of Korea’s Jurisprudence: Influence of International Human Rights Law

[Editor’s Note: This is the third and final entry in our symposium on the “30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, Part I is available here, and Part II is available here.] —Yoomin Won, JSD candidate, Stanford Law School Korea is more global than ever, which is clearly

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Published on March 12, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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I–CONnect Symposium: The 30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea—Introduction: Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a special symposium on the 30th anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea. The Court marked this historic moment last year in 2018. We are grateful to Professor Kyu Ho Youm for convening this symposium with a diverse array of participants. We hope this symposium will inspire more research

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Published on March 5, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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First Rivers, then Mountains, and Now the Amazon. Do “Things” Have Rights?

—Jorge Iván Palacio, former Justice of Colombia’s Constitutional Court and Supreme Court of Justice, and Juan C. Herrera, former law clerk of the Constitutional Court of Colombia; PhD Researcher and Teaching Assistant in Constitutional Law, Universitat Pompeu Fabra; Visiting Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg In the

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Published on September 18, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Book Review: Jeffrey Goldsworthy on Se-shauna Wheatle’s “Principled Reasoning in Human Rights Adjudication”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Jeffrey Goldsworthy reviews Se-shauna Wheatle’s Principled Reasoning in Human Rights Adjudication (Oxford: Hart 2017).] —Jeffrey Goldsworthy, Emeritus Professor of Law, Monash University, Adjunct Professor of Law, The University of Adelaide Se-shauna Wheatle’s book concerns judicial reasoning in human rights cases that purports to be based on “unwritten” or “implied”

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Published on October 24, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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The Impact of a Trump Presidency for Constitutionalism and Human Rights in Latin America (I-CONnect Column)

—Javier Couso, Universidad Diego Portales [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2017,

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Published on February 9, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Book Review: Jacob Weinrib on Catherine Dupré’s “The Age of Dignity: Human Rights and Constitutionalism in Europe”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Jacob Weinrib reviews Catherine Dupré’s book on The Age of Dignity: Human Rights and Constitutionalism in Europe (Oxford: Hart 2015)] —Jacob Weinrib, Assistant Professor, Queen’s University Faculty of Law Catherine Dupré’s The Age of Dignity is a truly ambitious book.  It promises nothing less than an exposition of the organizing

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Published on July 8, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Taking “The Dark Side” Seriously: Constitutionalism and the Question of Constitutional Progress Or: Why it is Fitting to Have the 2016 ICON-S Conference in Berlin (I·CON 13, Issue 4: Editorial)

—Mattias Kumm, NYU School of Law I. It is an obvious point that the global history of constitutionalism cannot plausibly be told as a simple progress narrative. The French and American Revolutions did not trigger an ineluctable steady march of progress. And the end of the Cold War did not bring about the realization of

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Published on February 11, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Editorials