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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Human rights"
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Book Review: Jeffrey Goldsworthy on Se-shauna Wheatle’s “Principled Reasoning in Human Rights Adjudication”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Jeffrey Goldsworthy reviews Se-shauna Wheatle’s Principled Reasoning in Human Rights Adjudication (Oxford: Hart 2017).] —Jeffrey Goldsworthy, Emeritus Professor of Law, Monash University, Adjunct Professor of Law, The University of Adelaide Se-shauna Wheatle’s book concerns judicial reasoning in human rights cases that purports to be based on “unwritten” or “implied”

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Published on October 24, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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The Impact of a Trump Presidency for Constitutionalism and Human Rights in Latin America (I-CONnect Column)

—Javier Couso, Universidad Diego Portales [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2017,

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Published on February 9, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Book Review: Jacob Weinrib on Catherine Dupré’s “The Age of Dignity: Human Rights and Constitutionalism in Europe”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Jacob Weinrib reviews Catherine Dupré’s book on The Age of Dignity: Human Rights and Constitutionalism in Europe (Oxford: Hart 2015)] —Jacob Weinrib, Assistant Professor, Queen’s University Faculty of Law Catherine Dupré’s The Age of Dignity is a truly ambitious book.  It promises nothing less than an exposition of the organizing

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Published on July 8, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Taking “The Dark Side” Seriously: Constitutionalism and the Question of Constitutional Progress Or: Why it is Fitting to Have the 2016 ICON-S Conference in Berlin (I·CON 13, Issue 4: Editorial)

—Mattias Kumm, NYU School of Law I. It is an obvious point that the global history of constitutionalism cannot plausibly be told as a simple progress narrative. The French and American Revolutions did not trigger an ineluctable steady march of progress. And the end of the Cold War did not bring about the realization of

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Published on February 11, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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Norway: Human Rights and Judicial Review Constitutionalized

–Anine Kierulf, Post-Doctoral Researcher, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo Law School Today Norway made judicial review part of its written constitution. This amendment marks the finalization of a human rights reform of Norway’s 200 year-old constitution. While but a codification of a 150-yearlong court-made practice of review, it also adds democratic legitimacy

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Published on June 5, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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EU Accession to the ECHR: Ante Portas or a Mirage on the Horizon?

—Christina Eckes, University of Amsterdam, reviewing Vasiliki Kosta, Nikos Skoutaris, and Vassilis Tzevelekos, The EU Accession to the ECHR (Hart Publishing 2014, 402pp) Whether and when the European Union (EU) will accede to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) remains to be seen. What is certain is that the possibility of EU accession to the ECHR and

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Published on November 11, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Is There a Protected Right to Access the Internet?

—Jason M. Tenenbaum, Barton LLP Much of the international discussion with regard to access rights to the Internet has focused on the idea of “network neutrality,” and not on whether the right to access the Internet itself is protected. On a domestic level, countries like France[1] and Greece[2] have already created constitutional provisions to protect

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Published on June 6, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Horizontality and the EU Charter

–Alison Young, Fellow and Tutor in law at Hertford College, University of Oxford [cross-posted from UK Constitutional Law Blog] Concerns are often raised as to the impact of EU’s human rights provisions in English law, particularly concerning the impact of the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms. How far does the Charter apply and, in particular,

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Published on January 29, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis