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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Hugo Chavez"
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Symposium on “Venezuela’s 2017 (Authoritarian) National Constituent Assembly”–Pursuing Constitutional Authoritarianism

[Editor’s Note: This is the fifth of six parts in our symposium on the subject of “Venezuela’s 2017 (Authoritarian) National Constituent Assembly.” The introduction to the symposium is available here.] –José Ignacio Hernández G.* In the middle of civil protests, on May 1, 2017 Venezuela’s President Nicolás Maduro announced his intention to convoke a “National Constituent Assembly”

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Published on September 1, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Symposium on “Venezuela’s 2017 (Authoritarian) National Constituent Assembly”–The National Constituent Assembly in Venezuela (2017) in its Historical Context

[Editor’s Note: This is the third of six parts in our symposium on the subject of “Venezuela’s 2017 (Authoritarian) National Constituent Assembly.” The introduction to the symposium is available here.] –Carlos García-Soto* The institutional history of Venezuela has witnessed many “Constituent Processes” and constitutional reforms, resulting in several constitutional texts from 1811 until today.  It is important

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Published on August 30, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Symposium on “Venezuela’s 2017 (Authoritarian) National Constituent Assembly”–Maduro’s National Constituent Assembly: Constituent Power to Build an Undemocratic Regime

[Editor’s Note: This is the second of six parts in our symposium on the subject of “Venezuela’s 2017 (Authoritarian) National Constituent Assembly.” The introduction to the symposium is available here.] –Miguel Ángel Martínez Meucci* Chavismo appeared in Venezuela’s political scene via a military coup led by Hugo Chávez, on February 4, 1992. A few years later, once

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Published on August 29, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Egypt and the Forgotten Lessons of Democratic Transitions (Or: Democracy is Hard)

—David Landau, Florida State University College of Law [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about the

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices