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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "German Constitutional Court"
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Fake News, Backlash and the Rise of the German Populist Right – An Update on German Developments

–Michaela Hailbronner, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Münster, Germany In the last few years, foreign observers have increasingly looked to Germany and Angela Merkel as potential new leaders of the free world. Rich, democratic and equipped with a strong belief in the Rechtsstaat, Germany has seemed a bastion of liberal democracy at a time when others

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Published on October 14, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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I-CONnect Symposium–The Chilean Constitutional Court’s Abortion Decision: Door Opened and Left Ajar

[Editor’s Note: This is Part I in our symposium on the one-year anniversary of the Chilean Constitutional Court’s abortion decision. The Introduction to the symposium is available here.] —Blanca Rodriguez-Ruiz, University of Seville The recent decriminalisation of abortion in Chile is indeed to be welcomed, yet it stands as a case of too little, too late. It has

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Published on August 1, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The German Constitutional Court’s Latest Decision on European Elections: No Protection Needed

—Dr. Markus W. Gehring, Deputy Director, Centre for European Legal Studies, Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge & Fellow in Law, Hughes Hall, and Ad personam Jean Monnet Chair in Sustainable Development Law & Associate Professor, University of Ottawa, Canada The German (Federal) Constitutional Court ruled two days ago on February 26 that the 3% hurdle for

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Published on February 28, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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An End to European Multilateralism: A Comment on the German Bundesverfassungsgericht’s OMT Decision

—Dr. Oliver Gerstenberg, University of Leeds When it comes to adjudicating the European sovereign debt crisis, the German Bundesverfassungsgericht (BVG) emerges as a sharply divided court. Back in August 2012, Mario Draghi pledged to do “whatever it takes” to prevent a single currency break-up. His words were followed by the Outright Monetary Transactions Programme (OMT),

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Published on February 19, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The “Rumble in Karlsruhe”: The German Federal Constitutional Court’s Historic OMT Case

—Russell A. Miller, Professor of Law, Washington & Lee University School of Law A few years ago I was at a transatlantic policy event in Washington, DC.  It was the height of the Eurozone’s sovereign debt and banking crisis and there was palpable fear that that the Euro would crumble.  If the ten year old

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Published on February 11, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Constitutional Dialogues in Italy

—Francesco Duranti, Università per Stranieri di Perugia (Italy) On January 13, the Italian Constitutional Court issued a judgment on the electoral law (no. 270/2005) for both Houses of Parliament (Camera dei Deputati, the Lower House; and Senato della Repubblica, the Upper House)[1]. In its decision—announced in a short press release on December 4, 2013[2]—the Court struck

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Published on January 22, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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A Coat of Many Colors

—Claudia E. Haupt, Associate-in-Law, Columbia Law School Cross-posted from the Center for Law and Religion Forum at St. John’s University School of Law In this post, I want to pick up some of the themes I alluded to in my first post and respond to Marc’s observations here and Mark’s observations here. The title of this

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Published on June 15, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis