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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Federalism"
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Conference Report–Symposium on “The Constitution of Canada: History, Evolution, Influence, and Reform”

—Asress Gikay, Matteo Monti, and Orlando Scarcello, Scuola Universitaria Superiore Sant’Anna Pisa (SSSA)–Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy On May 24, 2017, the Institute of Law, Politics and Development (Istituto di Diritto, Politica e Sviluppo) [DIRPOLIS] of Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies hosted a symposium on “The Constitution of Canada: History, Evolution, Influence & Reform”,

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Published on July 19, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Italian Constitutional Challenge: An Overview of the Upcoming Referendum

—Lorenza Violini, Full Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Milan, and Antonia Baraggia, Post-doctoral Fellow, University of Milan As it is well known, Italy is in the midst of a great constitutional reform, which–if approved by the referendum that will be held on December 4th–will modify 47 Articles of the Constitution (corresponding to 33% of the

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Published on December 2, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Developments in Belgian Constitutional Law: The Year 2015 in Review

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth installment in our Year-in-Review series. We welcome similar reports from scholars around the world on their own jurisdictions for publication on I-CONnect. Earlier year-in-review reports have been published on Italy, the Slovak Republic and Romania.  As we have done in the past, we reiterate our sincere thanks to our contributors for how much they have

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Published on October 12, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Conference Report–Symposium on “State Constitutional Change,” University of Arkansas School of Law

—Jonathan Marshfield, University of Arkansas School of Law On January 22, 2016, the Arkansas Law Review hosted a symposium on State Constitutional Change:  Traditions, Trends, and Theory at the University of Arkansas School of Law in Fayetteville, Arkansas.  I convened the symposium along with Richard Albert (Boston College).  The aim of the symposium was to

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Published on February 17, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Nepal: Agree to (have the Supreme Court) Disagree

—Vikram Aditya Narayan, Advocate, Supreme Court of India Until a couple of decades ago, federalism was nothing more than an academic subject in Nepal. However, it has now become a political reality, with the Parliament/Constituent Assembly deliberating over the manner in which Nepal can and should transform itself under the new Constitution. The basis for a

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Published on June 23, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Taking Aim at Cooperative Federalism: The Long-Gun Registry Decision by the Supreme Court of Canada

—Johanne Poirier[*], Université libre de Bruxelles  On March 27, 2015, a highly divided Supreme Court of Canada rendered a momentous ruling which reveals a severe divergence on the nature of Canadian contemporary federalism.[1]  The tight 5 to 4 decision also underlines a different conception of the role of the judicial branch regarding the defence and promotion

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Published on April 15, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Cooperative Federalism Divides the Supreme Court of Canada: Quebec (Attorney General) v. Canada (Attorney General)

—Paul Daly, University of Montreal, Faculty of Law On Friday, the Supreme Court of Canada brought to an end the lengthy saga of Canada’s long-gun registry. There was a sharp split on the Court, with a bare majority of five justices giving a narrow win to the federal government over the joint dissent of their three

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Published on March 30, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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New Scholarship Review: Interview with Jonathan Marshfield on Federalism and the Amendment Power

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of I-CONnect’s interview series, I speak with Jonathan Marshfield about his forthcoming paper on Decentralizing the Amendment Power. In his new paper, Marshfield explores how and why constitutional amendment rules might be structured to include subnational units in the process of formal amendment. He concludes that “although

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Published on March 24, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices
 
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Video Interview: National Supreme Courts and Legal Complexity, Featuring Kate Glover

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this latest installment of our new video interview series at I-CONnect, I interview Kate Glover on the subject of national supreme courts and legal complexity, with a particular focus on Canada in comparative perspective. In the interview, we discuss why and how supreme courts matter, whether conventional approaches to

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Published on December 11, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Is a Federal Britain Now Inevitable?

–Stephen Tierney, Professor of Constitutional Theory in the School of Law, University of Edinburgh and Director of the Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law; ESRC Senior Research Fellow, ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change. The Smith Commission Report issued today promises a restructuring of the United Kingdom which may prove to be more significant than the devolution settlement of

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Published on November 27, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments