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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "European Union" (Page 4)
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Book Review: “Process and Procedure in EU Administration”

–Luca de Lucia, University of Salerno, reviewing Carol Harlow & Richard Rawlings, Process and Procedure in EU Administration (Hart Publishing, December 2014, 352pp) This book by Carol Harlow and Richard Rawlings brings an important enrichment to the literature on European public law. Administrative procedure is at the centre of the analysis and is defined as ‘a course of

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Published on February 27, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Judging the Bankers (or Not): The Rise of the ECB and the Transformation of EU Constitutionalism

—Nicole Scicluna, Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), University of Birmingham The European Central Bank (ECB) embodies the politicised technocracy that characterises EU governance. It was pushed to centre stage by the euro crisis and by national governments’ unwillingness or inability to come up with timely and credible solutions. Despite protestations by former chief, Jean-Claude

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Published on February 13, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Discovering the Logic of Administrative Law–A Reply to Guy Seidman and Dolores Utrilla

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Article Review Series, Guilio Napolitano responds to two separate reviews by Guy Seidman and Dolores Utrilla of his article on Conflicts and Strategies in Administrative Law, which appears in the current issue of I•CON. The full article is available for free here. Guy Seidman’s review of the article is available here, and Dolores

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Published on September 3, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Horizontality and the EU Charter

–Alison Young, Fellow and Tutor in law at Hertford College, University of Oxford [cross-posted from UK Constitutional Law Blog] Concerns are often raised as to the impact of EU’s human rights provisions in English law, particularly concerning the impact of the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms. How far does the Charter apply and, in particular,

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Published on January 29, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Fletcher and Carolan: Debate on “the Lost Constitution” in the UK and the US

[Editor’s Note: In this exchange on I•CONnect, Jamie Fletcher and Eoin Carolan debate the idea of “the Lost Constitution” in conservative and libertarian politics in the United Kingdom and the United States.] The Rise of the “Lost Constitution” Argument Within Right-of-Center Politics in the United Kingdom and United States of America  —Jamie Fletcher, Lecturer in

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Published on December 23, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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National Parliaments in the EU: Biting the Subsidiarity Bait?

—Davor Jancic, British Academy Newton Fellow, Department of Law, London School of Economics and Political Science The parliamentarization of the European Union has been hailed as one of the hallmarks of the Treaty of Lisbon. Besides empowering the European Parliament, the Member States’ national parliaments have been endowed with a series of competences in EU

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Published on September 25, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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New Scholarship Review: Interview with Federico Fabbrini

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of I-CONnect’s interview series, I speak with Federico Fabbrini about his forthcoming paper on The Euro-Crisis and the Courts: Judicial Review and the Political Process in Comparative Perspective. In his paper, Professor Fabbrini explores the increasing involvement of courts in the fiscal and economic affairs of the state, with a

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Marry me or tax me? That is the constitutional question

—Angelique Devaux, French Licensed Attorney (Notaire), LL.M. in American Law (Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law) To marry or tax me. This could be the modern Shakespeare quote heard in the oral arguments last March 27th at the US Supreme Court in the pending case Windsor v. United States. But it is more about a

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Published on April 29, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Ombudsman as an Institution of European Administrative Law

—Dr. Julia Haas, Attorney-at-law (Rechtsanwältin), Hamburg (Germany) The ombudsman is presumably one of the most important Scandinavian contributions to worldwide constitutional development. Its origins can be traced back to the Swedish institution of the Justitieombudsman which was introduced in the Swedish constitution of 1809. The original Swedish idea of an “ombudsman” (meaning “representative” or “commissioner”)

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Published on March 27, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, Younger Comparativists; New Scholarship
 
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Thoughts on the German Constitutional Court Decision on the ESM

–Richard Stith, Valparaiso University The German Federal Constitutional Court’s decision of September 12, 2012, has been welcomed by some as signaling yet another political retreat, yet another ”Son of Solange II”. But what should bring joy to the heart of every American comparative law teacher is that, whether retreat or advance, every new “red line” drawn

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Published on October 18, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Developments