magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "European Union"
formats

Book Review: Matteo De Nes on Nicola Lupo & Giovanni Piccirilli’s “The Italian Parliament in the European Union”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Matteo De Nes reviews The Italian Parliament in the European Union (Oxford: Hart 2017) edited by Nicola Lupo & Giovanni Piccirilli.] –Matteo De Nes, Post-doc Fellow in Constitutional Law, University of Padua, Italy Nicola Lupo and Giovanni Piccirilli’s edited book addresses a very hot topic in the recent

Read More…

Published on February 27, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
formats

Virtual Bookshelf: A Review of “The Italian Parliament in the European Union” by Nicola Lupo and Giovanni Piccirilli

—Richard Albert, The University of Texas at Austin In the most recent installment in the new Hart Series on Parliamentary Democracy in Europe, Nicola Lupo (LUISS Rome) and Giovanni Piccirilli (LUISS Rome) bring us an edited volume on The Italian Parliament in the European Union (Oxford: Hart 2017). Lupo and Piccirilli have assembled roughly 20

Read More…

Published on February 7, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
formats

Can International Organisations Help to Stem Democratic Decay? (I-CONnect Column)

—Tom Gerald Daly, Fellow, Melbourne Law School; Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For

Read More…

Published on November 16, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

I-CONnect Symposium: The Independence Vote in Catalonia–! Aidez la Catalogne et l’Espagne !

[Editor’s Note: This is the second entry in our symposium on Sunday’s independence vote in Catalonia. We are grateful to our convener, Professor Zoran Oklopcic, for assembling an outstanding group of scholars to bring our readers helpful context and analysis during this important moment for the region. The introduction to our symposium is available here.] —Antoni Abat i

Read More…

Published on October 3, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Book Review: Raul A. Sanchez-Urribarri on David Kosař’s “Perils of Judicial Self-Government in Transitional Societies”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Raul A. Sanchez-Urribarri reviews David Kosař’s book on Perils of Judicial Self-Government in Transitional Societies (Cambridge 2016)] –Raul A. Sanchez-Urribarri, Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Legal Studies, La Trobe University One of the key ideals driving judicial reform agendas is judicial independence.  Countless resources have been dedicated to safeguarding judges’

Read More…

Published on July 27, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
formats

Cooperative Brexit: Giving Back Control Over Trade Policy (I·CON Volume 15, Issue 2: Editorial)

We invited Thomas Streinz,* Fellow at the Institute for International Law and Justice, NYU School of Law, to contribute a Guest Editorial to our Journal. Taking Joseph Weiler’s recent Editorial, “The Case for a Kinder, Gentler Brexit”, as its starting point, Mr Streinz argues that the principle of “sincere cooperation” requires the Union and a

Read More…

Published on July 6, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
formats

Legal Uncertainty Surrounding the Approval of the Brexit Agreement

—Antonios Kouroutakis, Assistant Professor, IE University The referendum of June 23rd 2016 and the majority vote in favour of Brexit led British constitutional law into uncharted territories as Paul Craig has accurately said.[1] The constitutional order of the United Kingdom is being overwhelmed by a paradox. Although it is governed by the principle of parliamentary

Read More…

Published on June 28, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Of the Politics of Resentment and European Disintegration: Are the European Peoples Ready to Keep Paddling Together? Part II

[Editor’s Note: This is Part II of a two-part series. Part I was published here on February 26, 2017.] —Tomasz Tadeusz Koncewicz, Professor of Law and Director of the Department of European and Comparative Law at the University of Gdańsk, Poland* As I have argued in Part I of this series, the “politics of resentment” endanger the

Read More…

Published on March 9, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Of the Politics of Resentment and European Disintegration: Are the European Peoples Ready to Keep Paddling Together? Part I

—Tomasz Tadeusz Koncewicz, Professor of Law and Director of the Department of European and Comparative Law at the University of Gdańsk, Poland* The Politics of Resentment. What is in a Name? It is trite to say that today “resentment” sweeps across Europe. Yet beyond this sweeping statement, the concept itself, its consequences and modus operandi, are

Read More…

Published on February 26, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

The Case for a Kinder, Gentler Brexit

—J.H.H. Weiler, University Professor, European Union Jean Monnet Chair, New York University Law School; Co-Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Constitutional Law Of course, we know better than to be shooting at each other; but the post-June 23 relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union is woefully bellicose, and increasingly so. In tone and mood,

Read More…

Published on February 5, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Editorials