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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Egypt" (Page 2)
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Egypt: Democratic Coup?

The ongoing situation in Egypt calls to mind Ozan Varol’s article in the Harvard International Law Journal on The Democratic Coup d’Etat, itself motivated in part by the 2011 coup against Mubarak.  Varol’s argument in a nutshell is that, simply, that there are coups and then there are coups.  US federal law treats them all

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Published on July 5, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Egypt’s Constitution: The Religious Pot

–Mohamed Abdelaal, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Alexandria University School of Law Immediately after the Egyptian Revolution in 2011, which ended thirty years of repression and dictatorship under the regime of former President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians faced the serious challenge of electing a new president and building a new Egypt. Amidst these

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Published on May 2, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Egypt’s Leap into the Unknown: Article 219 and the Shari`‘a in the Draft Constitution

—Clark B. Lombardi, University of Washington School of Law, and Nathan J. Brown, George Washington University   (Posted originally on foreignpolicy.com) If a student of constitutional texts sat down to read the draft Egyptian constitution from beginning to end, he or she would find much of it familiar — the language, structure, and institutions would

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Published on December 14, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Real Winner in the Egyptian Constitution? The Military

[cross-posted from the HuffingtonPost]               As Cairo’s streets fill with protestors after the rushed passage of the new draft Constitution, all eyes are on the confrontation between the newly re-energized opposition and the supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood.  Yet, while controversy swirls around the reach of Islam and the

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Published on December 10, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Egypt’s Constitutional Crisis is Far from Over

—Jill Goldenziel, Lecturer on Government and Social Studies, Harvard College and Lecturer in Law, Boston University School of Law On Sunday’s episode of the riveting drama, “Constitutional Crisis in Egypt,” the Supreme Constitutional Court postponed its ruling on the legitimacy of the constituent assembly that hurriedly completed a draft of the new Egyptian Constitution. The judges claimed

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Published on December 5, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Developments, New Voices
 
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Awful Process, Terrible Ending and (Most likely) Disastrous Results

—Andrew Arato, Dorothy Hart Hirshon Professor of Political and Social Theory, The New School No serious interpreter has claimed that the Egyptian constitution-making process has been satisfactory or even adequate. Even in the context of revolutionary populist constitution making to which this case belongs, the Egyptian version is distinguished by its inconsistencies and idiosyncrasies. In revolutions,

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Published on November 29, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Is Egypt’s Transition to Democracy Really So Stupid?

—William Partlett, Columbia University Law School & Brookings Institution [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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Egypt and the Forgotten Lessons of Democratic Transitions (Or: Democracy is Hard)

—David Landau, Florida State University College of Law [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about the

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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The Military, Constitutional Democracy, and Egypt

—Ozan Varol, Lewis & Clark Law School [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about the pace

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices