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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Ecuador"
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Ecuador’s “Unstoppable” Constitutional Referendum

—Mauricio Guim, S.J.D. candidate and Presidential Fellow in Data Science, University of Virginia School of Law & Augusto Verduga, LL.M. candidate, Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar, Quito, Ecuador[1] Soon after winning the presidential election, new President Lenin Moreno announced a referendum to amend Ecuador’s Constitution. The proposal is the centerpiece of a so-far successful scheme to

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Published on December 16, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Is Ecuador Heading Towards a Constitutional Crisis?

–Mauricio Guim, S.J.D. candidate and Presidential Fellow in Data Science, University of Virginia School of Law & Augusto Verduga, LL.M. candidate, Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar, Quito, Ecuador The Republic of Ecuador is going through one of the most interesting transitions in the world. This past summer, in a contested election that almost tore the country

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Published on November 1, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Ecuador After Rafael Correa: A Re-Engagement with Liberal Constitutionalism? (I-CONnect Column)

—Javier Couso, Universidad Diego Portales [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2017,

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Published on June 21, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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There are Still Judges in Berlin: On the Proposal to Amend the Ecuadorian Constitution to Allow Indefinite Presidential Reelection

—Carlos Bernal Pulido, Macquarie Law School Es gibt noch Richter in Berlin!, There are still judges in Berlin! was the well-known acclamation of the humble miller, when he learned that the Prussian King Frederick II, the Great, had ordered the demolition of his mill obstructing the views of the new royal palace in Potsdam. The

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Published on September 10, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Constituent Dilemma in Latin America

–Gabriel L. Negretto, Associate Professor, Division of Political Studies, CIDE Since the great revolutions of the late eighteenth century, the central principle of democratic constitutionalism has been that the people, as the supreme authority in a polity, is the only legitimate author of constitutions. This principle was enshrined in the theory of constituent power, according

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Published on September 9, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis