magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Democratic backsliding"
formats

ICON Book Review: Piotr Mikuli on Wojciech Sadurski’s “Poland’s Constitutional Breakdown”

[Editor’s Note: This book review by Piotr Mikuli of Wojciech Sadurski’s new book, Poland’s Constitutional Breakdown, is forthcoming in the next issue of ICON.] Wojciech Sadurski. Poland’s Constitutional Breakdown. Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. 304. ISBN 978-0198840503 The book’s title refers to the expression “constitutional breakdown”, which seems to reflect the author’s profound thoughts regarding

Read More…

Published on November 26, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
formats

The Party Fragmentation Paradox in Brazil: A Shield Against Authoritarianism?

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília and National Council for Scientific and Technological Development Brazil features possibly the most fragmented party system in the world. At this current legislative term, there are 25 parties with representation in the Lower House, and 16 in the Senate. The level of fragmentation is so steep that the biggest

Read More…

Published on October 24, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Indonesia’s Pesta Demokrasi in the Face of Regressing Constitutional Democracy

—Dian A H Shah, National University Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about

Read More…

Published on April 17, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Are Constitutional Democracies Really in Crisis?

—Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Harvard Law School It may seem churlish for one of the co-editors of the recently published Constitutional Democracies in Crisis? (with Mark Graber and Sanford Levinson) to raise questions about what readers might take to be the book’s basic conceptualization, that we are experiencing a widespread crisis for

Read More…

Published on September 11, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

When is a Limp More than a Limp? Diagnosing Democratic Decay

—Tom Gerald Daly, Fellow, Melbourne Law School; Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law Sometimes a limp is just a limp–arising from a debilitating yet isolated injury or infection that will soon heal. However, sometimes a limp can be indicative of a degenerative disease such as multiple sclerosis. Gaining a clear diagnosis and prognosis of

Read More…

Published on July 12, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Comparative Law in the Age of Trump (I-CONnect Column)

—Aslı Bâli, UCLA School of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2017,

Read More…

Published on February 22, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Time to View Democratic Decay as a Unified Research Field?

—Tom Gerald Daly, Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law Each passing month brings more warnings of global democratic decay, which we might loosely define as the incremental degradation of the structures and substance of liberal democracy, as distinct from a clear and rapid breakdown of democratic rule. September began with a speech by the UN

Read More…

Published on September 30, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis