magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "democracy"
formats

Self-Determination without Democracy: The Curious Case of the Horn of Africa

—Berihun Adugna Gebeye, Humboldt Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.] What course the postcolonial state and its people should take to achieve liberation and self-determination,

Read More…

Published on July 28, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Book Review: Sabrina Ragone on “An Uneven Balance? A Legal Analysis of Power Asymmetries between National Parliaments in the EU” (Hoai-Thu Nguyen)

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Sabrina Ragone reviews Hoai-Thu Nguyen’s book on An Uneven Balance? A Legal Analysis of Power Asymmetries between National Parliaments in the EU (Eleven Publishing, 2018).] —Sabrina Ragone, Associate Professor of Comparative Public Law, University of Bologna. The volume An Uneven Balance? A Legal Analysis of Power Asymmetries between

Read More…

Published on December 24, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
formats

Book Review: Orlando Scarcello on “Populism and Democracy” (Sascha Hardt, Aalt Willem Heringa and Hoai-Thu Nguyen, eds.)

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Orlando Scarcello reviews Sascha Hardt, Aalt Willem Heringa and Hoai-Thu Nguyen’s book on Populism and Democracy (Eleven Publishing, 2020).] —Orlando Scarcello, Postdoctoral Researcher in Public law, LUISS Guido Carli, Rome. What is populism and what does it have to do with democracy? Questions of this kind

Read More…

Published on December 17, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
formats

Black theories matter in achieving a real democracy in Brazil: reflections celebrating the National Black Consciousness Day

— Manuellita Hermes, PhD. Candidate at Università degli Studi di Roma II, Tor Vergata; Rômulo Bittencourt, Master Student of the Graduate-Level Program in Literature and Culture of the Universidade Federal da Bahia. Next November 20th is the National Black Consciousness Day (Dia da Consciência Negra) in Brazil. Specially in 2020, the resurgence of a racial debate in Brazil and

Read More…

Published on November 19, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

The “Rationality of Fear” on the Edge of Brazilian Democracy: Another Shield Against Authoritarianism?

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília and National Council for Scientific and Technological Development[1] In a period of about two months, a series of protests in South America brought the region again into the spotlight. Except for the Bolivian case,[2] whose causes were mostly related to the presidential election process, the protests in Chile, Ecuador,

Read More…

Published on December 31, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

I–CONnect Symposium: The 30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea—Part II: The South Korean Constitutional Court in Comparative Perspective

[Editor’s Note: This is the second entry in our symposium on the “30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea.” The introduction to the symposium is available here and Part I is available here.] —Tom Ginsburg, Leo Spitz Professor of International Law and Ludwig and Hilde Wolf Research Scholar, The University of Chicago As the Constitutional Court of

Read More…

Published on March 9, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

I–CONnect Symposium: The 30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea—Part I: The Constitutional Court’s Role in South Korea’s Democratization

[Editor’s Note: This is the first entry in our symposium on the “30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea.” The introduction to the symposium is available here.] —Ilwon Kang, Former Justice, Constitutional Court of Korea “South Korea shows the world how democracy is done,” wrote a Washington Post columnist, praising the March 10, 2017, decision of

Read More…

Published on March 7, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Democratic Erosion and Militant Democracy

–Tom Ginsburg and Aziz Huq, The University of Chicago Law School In 1937, the German political scientist Karl Loewenstein published a two-part article that coined the term militant democracy.[1]  Concerned with the inadequate democratic response to the rising threat of fascism, he called for a set of legislative and legal techniques that would allow democracy

Read More…

Published on October 18, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

I-CONnect Symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries” — Constitutional Theory and Boundary Problems: Some Reflections

[Editor’s Note: This is the first entry in our symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries.” The introduction to the symposium is available here.] –Lael K Weis, Senior Lecturer, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Law School The invitation to participate in the Constitutional Boundaries Workshop provided me with an important opportunity to reflect on the development and trajectory of my early career

Read More…

Published on April 23, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Populist Constitutionalism & The Democratic Minimum Core

—Rosalind Dixon, University of New South Wales [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Democratic “populism” is on the rise worldwide. In the last decade, Latin America has seen a wave of populist, neo-Bolivarian political change; Hungary

Read More…

Published on April 26, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis