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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Constitutionalism"
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Governing in a Liberal-Constitutional State: Dealing With the Clash Between Legality and Legitimacy in Chile and Spain (I-CONnect Column)

—Javier Couso, Universidad Diego Portales & Utrecht University [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists

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Published on October 18, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populism and the Courts

—Andrew Arato, The New School [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] The antagonism of populist governments to apex courts is a matter of historical record, starting with Peronism, the first time that an openly populist movement

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Published on April 25, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populist Constitutions – A Contradiction in Terms?

—Jan-Werner Müller, Princeton University [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. Professor Müller’s post is adapted from his book What is Populism? (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) and from “Populism and Constitutionalism,” forthcoming in the Oxford Handbook of Populism.]

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Published on April 23, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Impact of a Trump Presidency for Constitutionalism and Human Rights in Latin America (I-CONnect Column)

—Javier Couso, Universidad Diego Portales [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2017,

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Published on February 9, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Time to View Democratic Decay as a Unified Research Field?

—Tom Gerald Daly, Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law Each passing month brings more warnings of global democratic decay, which we might loosely define as the incremental degradation of the structures and substance of liberal democracy, as distinct from a clear and rapid breakdown of democratic rule. September began with a speech by the UN

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Published on September 30, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Taking “The Dark Side” Seriously: Constitutionalism and the Question of Constitutional Progress Or: Why it is Fitting to Have the 2016 ICON-S Conference in Berlin (I·CON 13, Issue 4: Editorial)

—Mattias Kumm, NYU School of Law I. It is an obvious point that the global history of constitutionalism cannot plausibly be told as a simple progress narrative. The French and American Revolutions did not trigger an ineluctable steady march of progress. And the end of the Cold War did not bring about the realization of

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Published on February 11, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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The Constitutionalism Debate in China

—Rogier Creemers, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies & St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford Cross-posted from the Blog of the UK Constitutional Law Group Over the past few months, a heated debate about the role of the Constitution in Chinese political life has emerged. This debate comes in the wake of the 18th Party Congress and

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Published on July 17, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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I·CON Book Forum

The current issue of I·CON features an exchange between Alec Stone Sweet and Nico Krisch on Krisch’s recent book, Beyond Constitutionalism: The Pluralist Structure of Post-National Law. We are happy to provide free access to this exchange for I·CONnect readers and to invite you to join the discussion on this blog. Click the titles to

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Published on June 30, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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Will Democracy and Constitutionalism Mix in Myanmar?

—Dominic J Nardi, Jr, University of Michigan Department of Political Science Myanmar’s[1] constitution – adopted after a controversial referendum in May 2008 – created the country’s first constitutional court in half a century. Initially, few if any observers believed the Constitutional Tribunal would play a significant role. However, within a few months, the tribunal seemed to be

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Published on October 24, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Developments