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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "constitutional design" (Page 2)
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Symposium Report–Constitutionalism, Religious Freedom and Human Rights: Constitutional Migration and Transjudicialism beyond the North Atlantic

–Mirjam Künkler (Princeton University), Shylashri Shankar (Centre for Policy Research, Delhi) and Tine Stein (University of Kiel); Co-organizers for this Symposium held at Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover, Germany, June 3-6, 2015, funded by the Volkswagen Foundation Creating a framework of religion-state relations that would mollify tensions between religions, within religions, and between believers and non-believers, has been the bane

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Published on January 23, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Video Interview: The Design of the Iraqi Constitution Featuring Haider Ala Hamoudi

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this latest installment of our video interview series at I-CONnect, I interview Haider Ala Hamoudi on the Iraqi Constitution. I conducted the interview from the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa, where I am serving as a visiting scholar for the month of July. My thanks to

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Published on July 16, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Nepal: Agree to (have the Supreme Court) Disagree

—Vikram Aditya Narayan, Advocate, Supreme Court of India Until a couple of decades ago, federalism was nothing more than an academic subject in Nepal. However, it has now become a political reality, with the Parliament/Constituent Assembly deliberating over the manner in which Nepal can and should transform itself under the new Constitution. The basis for a

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Published on June 23, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Words to a Delegate: Crafting Article V

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students J.D. Student Contribution –Larissa Warren, rising 3L, Boston College Law School [Editor’s note: The students in my advanced seminar on constitutional amendment wrote excellent papers in their take-home examination for the course. They were given a choice of two questions to answer: (1) “Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to

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Published on June 13, 2015
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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New Scholarship Review: Interview with Jonathan Marshfield on Federalism and the Amendment Power

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of I-CONnect’s interview series, I speak with Jonathan Marshfield about his forthcoming paper on Decentralizing the Amendment Power. In his new paper, Marshfield explores how and why constitutional amendment rules might be structured to include subnational units in the process of formal amendment. He concludes that “although

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Published on March 24, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices
 
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Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students J.D. Student Contribution [Editor’s note: The students in my advanced seminar on constitutional amendment wrote excellent papers in their take-home examination for the course. They were given a choice of two questions to answer: (1) “Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?”; or (2) “Assume the year is

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Published on February 20, 2015
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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Video Interview: Trends in Modern Authoritarianism Featuring Ozan Varol

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of our new video interview series at I-CONnect, I interview Ozan Varol on trends in modern authoritarianism. In the interview, we discuss how modern authoritarians use constitutional design and the law to serve their objectives. We also discuss recent scholarship on the subject, including a paper on Stealth

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Published on October 10, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Note on the Provisional Constitution of the Federal Republic of Somalia

—Antonios Kouroutakis, University of Oxford, Faculty of Law The Provisional Constitution of the Federal Republic of Somalia (the Constitution) is the supreme law of Federal Republic of Somalia (Somalia). The drafting process occurred under the auspices of United Nations, and on 1 August 2012, the National Constitutional Assembly approved the Constitution by an overwhelming majority. The Constitution

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Published on September 18, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Egypt: What’s Next?

—Mohamed Abdelaal, Assistant Professor of Constitutional and Administrative Law, Alexandria University, School of Law Was the overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi on June 30 a popular revolution or a military coup? The debate is outdated. What is more important is that the events of June 30 returned Egypt to square one, right back where it

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Published on August 12, 2013
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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Why Entrench Formal Amendment Rules?

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Constitutional changes, both big and small, are underway in Egypt, Fiji, Tunisia and elsewhere. Constitutional designers in these and other countries face daunting challenges in dividing powers between governmental branches, balancing state prerogatives with individual rights, and managing majority-minority relations. Constitutional designers should also be particularly attentive to their

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Published on August 5, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices