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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "constitutional change"
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I-CONnect Symposium–The Aftermath of the Italian General Election of March 4, 2018–Taming the Crisis

[Editor’s Note: This is Part III in our symposium on the Italian General Election of March 4, 2018. The Introduction to the symposium is available here and Part II is available here. The symposium is convened by Antonia Baraggia.] —Alessandro Torre, Full Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Italy Despite the fact that the new

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Published on August 16, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Rise of Comparative Constitutional Change — Book Review: Reijer Passchier and Alissa Verhagen on “The Foundations and Traditions of Constitutional Amendment”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Reijer Passchier and Alissa Verhagen review The Foundations and Traditions of Constitutional Amendment (Hart 2017), edited by Richard Albert, Xenophon Contiades and Alkmene Fotiadou] –Reijer Passchier[*] and Alissa Verhagen[**] I. The renaissance of an issue The matter of constitutional change is one of the most difficult and challenging issues

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Published on April 4, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Richard Albert
 
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Symposium on “Constitutional Amendment and Dismemberment”

—Richard Albert, The University of Texas at Austin Earlier this week, the Yale Journal of International Law published my article on “Constitutional Amendment and Dismemberment.” The Journal also organized a symposium around the article featuring three responses by (1) Professor David Landau, Florida State University and I-CONnect founding co-editor, (2) Judge Carlos Bernal, Colombian Constitutional

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Published on March 2, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Is Ecuador Heading Towards a Constitutional Crisis?

–Mauricio Guim, S.J.D. candidate and Presidential Fellow in Data Science, University of Virginia School of Law & Augusto Verduga, LL.M. candidate, Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar, Quito, Ecuador The Republic of Ecuador is going through one of the most interesting transitions in the world. This past summer, in a contested election that almost tore the country

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Published on November 1, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Assessing the Risks of Constitutional Revisions (I-CONnect Column)

—Aslı Bâli, UCLA School of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on September 3, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Populist Constitutionalism & The Democratic Minimum Core

—Rosalind Dixon, University of New South Wales [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Democratic “populism” is on the rise worldwide. In the last decade, Latin America has seen a wave of populist, neo-Bolivarian political change; Hungary

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Published on April 26, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Abusive Judicial Activism and Judicial Independence in Brazil

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília When delivering his speech at the Brazilian Supreme Court on December 5 on “Public Ethics and Democracy,” Michael Sandel, Professor at Harvard University, could not foresee what was about to happen that very day just some floors above the conference room. Amid a rich debate on the role of

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Published on December 22, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Conference Report – “Democracy, Pacificism & Constitutional Change in Japan: Amending Art. 9?,” University of New South Wales

—Rosalind Dixon, University of New South Wales, and Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília On August 12, 2016, the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia, and the Australian Network for Japanese Law (ANJel) hosted the symposium “Democracy, Pacifism & Constitutional Change in Japan: Amending

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Published on August 26, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Chilean Constituent Process: A Long and Winding Road

—Alberto Coddou Mc Manus, Diego Portales University & University College of London Nowadays, Chile is undergoing a unique constituent process. A longstanding aim of several social movements, the idea of a new constitution now dominates the agenda, and is one of the main commitments of the current government. The commitment to replace the Constitution of

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Published on May 4, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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A Way Out of Hyper-Reformism? A Project of Constitutional Reorganization and Consolidation in Mexico

—Andrea Pozas-Loyo, IIJ-UNAM Mexico has one of the world’s oldest and most amended constitutions: its 99-year old constitution has been amended 642 times. De jure, Mexico’s constitution is pretty rigid: amendments require three-quarters of the present members of congress and approval of the majority of the states’ legislatures. During the hegemonic-party period, the PRI had

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Published on March 2, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis