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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "constitutional amendment" (Page 5)
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Amendments, Replacements and Constitutional Instability? The Case of the Dominican Republic

–Leiv Marsteintredet, Associate Professor in Latin American Area Studies, University of Oslo; Associate Professor in Comparative Politics, University of Bergen In a recent blog post on I-CONnect,[1] Jillian Blake discusses the very disturbing constitutional and legal developments on the right to nationality in the Dominican Republic and argues that they were facilitated by “…the unstable nature of the

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Published on October 3, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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There are Still Judges in Berlin: On the Proposal to Amend the Ecuadorian Constitution to Allow Indefinite Presidential Reelection

—Carlos Bernal Pulido, Macquarie Law School Es gibt noch Richter in Berlin!, There are still judges in Berlin! was the well-known acclamation of the humble miller, when he learned that the Prussian King Frederick II, the Great, had ordered the demolition of his mill obstructing the views of the new royal palace in Potsdam. The

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Published on September 10, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Call for Papers–Workshop on Comparative Constitutional Amendment

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Boston College Law School and the International Association of Constitutional Law’s Research Group on Constitution-Making and Constitutional Change invite submissions for a full-day workshop on comparative constitutional amendment, to be held on the campus of Boston College Law School on Friday, May 15, 2015. This workshop is convened by

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Published on September 9, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Constitutional Reform in Grenada

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School The Constitution of Grenada, still today a statute of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, may soon become a truly Grenadian Constitution. Grenada is in the process of reforming its constitution to give its people a constitution of their own making. And when the process concludes, the country may

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Published on August 20, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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An Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendment in Trinidad & Tobago?

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Two days ago, the House of Representatives in Trinidad & Tobago passed the Constitution (Amendment) Bill, 2014 by a simple majority. The bill must still pass the Senate by a simple majority and receive presidential assent before becoming law, but neither step is expected to pose a threat to

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Published on August 14, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Direct Democracy and Constitutional Change: Institutional Learning from State Laboratories in the USA

—Jurgen Goossens, Ph.D. Candidate Ghent University, LL.M. Yale Law School Although the federal constitutional amendment procedure in Article V of the U.S. Constitution has not been altered since its adoption 226 years ago, constitutional tradition in the 50 states has substantially evolved. For instance, popular referenda were unknown in 1787, but are now ubiquitous in

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Published on July 18, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The True Face of Disgust–A Comment on Japanese Constitutional Politics

–Kenji Ishikawa, Professor, University of Tokyo Faculty of Law Amongst the representative postwar works of Takami Jun – a writer little commented upon today – one finds the novel A Feeling of Disgust.[1] Its first-person narrator, speaking to readers in an informal, colloquial register, is a working-class anti-intellectual at odds with the claustrophobic mood of

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Published on July 5, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Constitutional Reform in Trinidad and Tobago

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Trinidad & Tobago has been engaged in a long and often interrupted process of constitutional renewal since adopting its Constitution in 1976. Calls for constitutional renewal appear to have grown loudest starting about ten years ago when a new Constitution was proposed in the House of Representatives in 2006. Another effort

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Published on May 2, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Constitutionalizing Canada’s Supreme Court

—Robert Leckey, McGill University A dispute over the legality of a politically questionable judicial appointment has resulted in what pundits call a stinging defeat for Canada’s prime minister and a bold assertion by the Supreme Court of Canada of its independence and constitutional status. Last week, in Reference re Supreme Court Act, ss. 5 and

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Published on March 25, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Senate Reform in Canada: What to Make of the Constitution?

—Leonid Sirota, JSD Candidate, NYU School of Law Over the course of three days last week, the Supreme Court of Canada heard submissions from the federal government, the ten provinces, two territories, two ami curiae, and several interveners on the constitutionality of the federal government’s proposals for reforming the unelected upper house of the Parliament

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Published on November 18, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis