magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "constitutional amendment" (Page 4)
formats

Is the Constitution of Canada the World’s Most Difficult to Amend?

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Studies of constitutional rigidity suggest that the United States Constitution is one of the world’s most difficult to change by formal amendment.[1] In light of the low rate of amendment success in the United States, this is hard to dispute: of the over 11,000 amendment proposals introduced in Congress

Read More…

Published on June 16, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Words to a Delegate: Crafting Article V

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students J.D. Student Contribution –Larissa Warren, rising 3L, Boston College Law School [Editor’s note: The students in my advanced seminar on constitutional amendment wrote excellent papers in their take-home examination for the course. They were given a choice of two questions to answer: (1) “Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to

Read More…

Published on June 13, 2015
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
formats

Norway: Human Rights and Judicial Review Constitutionalized

–Anine Kierulf, Post-Doctoral Researcher, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo Law School Today Norway made judicial review part of its written constitution. This amendment marks the finalization of a human rights reform of Norway’s 200 year-old constitution. While but a codification of a 150-yearlong court-made practice of review, it also adds democratic legitimacy

Read More…

Published on June 5, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

New Scholarship Review: Interview with Jonathan Marshfield on Federalism and the Amendment Power

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of I-CONnect’s interview series, I speak with Jonathan Marshfield about his forthcoming paper on Decentralizing the Amendment Power. In his new paper, Marshfield explores how and why constitutional amendment rules might be structured to include subnational units in the process of formal amendment. He concludes that “although

Read More…

Published on March 24, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices
 
formats

Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students J.D. Student Contribution [Editor’s note: The students in my advanced seminar on constitutional amendment wrote excellent papers in their take-home examination for the course. They were given a choice of two questions to answer: (1) “Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?”; or (2) “Assume the year is

Read More…

Published on March 11, 2015
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
formats

Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students J.D. Student Contribution [Editor’s note: The students in my advanced seminar on constitutional amendment wrote excellent papers in their take-home examination for the course. They were given a choice of two questions to answer: (1) “Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?”; or (2) “Assume the year is

Read More…

Published on February 20, 2015
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
formats

Video Interview: Judicial Appointments in India, Featuring Nick Robinson

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this latest installment of our new video interview series at I-CONnect, I interview Nick Robinson on the subject of judicial appointments in India. In the interview, we discuss how judicial appointment will change under 121st amendment to the Indian Constitution, which will constitutionalize the National Judicial Appointments Commission. We explore how

Read More…

Published on December 30, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Invitation to Friends of I-CONnect: Boston College Law School Event on “The War on Japan’s Pacifist Constitution”

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School On Wednesday, November 5, the Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy will host a timely panel discussion on “The War on Japan’s Pacifist Constitution” on the campus of Boston College Law School at 12pm in Barat House. I’m looking forward to moderating this panel featuring Tom Ginsburg (Chicago),

Read More…

Published on October 26, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Turkey Rolling Back the 2010 Reforms?

–Oya Yegen, Boston University, Department of Political Science Turkish judges and prosecutors cast their votes last week for the election of 10 regular and 6 substitute new members to the Supreme Board of Judges and Prosecutors (HSYK)[1]. The council’s new makeup has been the center of speculation. HSYK manages the Turkish judiciary and makes decisions regarding

Read More…

Published on October 24, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Video Interview: Developments in Spanish Constitutional Law Featuring Benito Alaez Corral

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of our new video interview series at I-CONnect, I interview Benito Aláez Corral on developments in Spanish constitutional law. In the interview, we explore the constitutional implications of secession, the tension between realizing the promise of socio-economic rights and the increasing financial pressures on the state, the role of Parliament in

Read More…

Published on October 8, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis