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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "constitutional amendment"
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Symposium |Constitutional Struggles in Asia | Part III | Thin but Resilient Constitutionalism in Japan?

[Editor’s Note: In light of recent constitutional (or some may say, unconstitutional) developments, I-CONnect is pleased to feature this timely symposium examining constitutional struggles in Asia. This is part III of a five part series, in addition to the Introduction.] — Akiko Ejima, School of Law, Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan Introduction: 75-year-old Constitution without amendment?

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Published on February 22, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium on The Legacies of Trumpism and Constitutional Democracy in the United States | Part V | Can “Leadership” Surmount the Obstacles Presented by the U.S. Constitution to Effective Governance? Reflections on our Present Discontents

[Editor’s Note: In light of this week’s inauguration, I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the state of US constitutionalism after Trump. The introduction to the symposium can be found here.] —Sanford V. Levinson, The University of Texas School of Law Changes in administration inevitably present another test case for determining the extent

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Published on January 24, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Curious Conservatism of Constitutional Amendment Politics in the United States

—Andrea Scoseria Katz, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. For more information about our four columnists for 2020, please click here.] A few days ago, an email popped into my inbox. It was a very typical email, the kind you delete dozens of

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Published on December 23, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Hungary has sped up in its sliding down the slope towards authoritarianism: the proposed Ninth Amendment and accompanying laws

—Tímea Drinóczi, Department of Constitutional Law, Faculty of Law, University of Pécs, Hungary On 10 November 2020, the Hungarian government submitted the Ninth Amendment to the Fundamental Law (FL) and some other laws to the parliament. These amendments have a great potential to increase the degree of exclusion affecting “others” – that can be the members of

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Published on November 21, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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A Constitutional Crisis of a Different Kind: Canada’s Slow March Back to Mega-Constitutional Politics

—Alexander Hudson, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. For more information about our four columnists for 2020, please click here.] It’s difficult to keep working on research with little relevance to the Covid-19 crisis that we all face in some way today.

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Published on March 25, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Myanmar’s Military-Allied Party Proposes Constitutional Amendment Increasing Civilian Powers

–Jason Gelbort, Legal Consultant On February 25, the union parliament of Myanmar (formerly known as Burma) began debating bills to amend the military-drafted 2008 constitution,[1] including a proposal from the military-allied Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP) that could significantly redraw the constitutional balance of powers between the military and the parliamentary-elected president. Among the

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Published on February 25, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Navigating Constitution Building and Political Transitions in Sri Lanka

—Dian A H Shah, National University Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about

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Published on November 27, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Slovakia Amends the Constitution to Cap the Retirement Age

—Simon Drugda, PhD Candidate at the University of Copenhagen On March 28, 2019, the Slovak Parliament amended the Constitution to cap the retirement age at 64. The imposition of retirement age is quite an unusual design feature in comparative constitutional law. In this post, I introduce the amendment and provide context for the change.

Published on May 16, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Slovak Constitutional Court Strikes Down a Constitutional Amendment—But the Amendment Remains Valid

—Simon Drugda, PhD Candidate at the University of Copenhagen On January 30, 2019, the Slovak Constitutional Court declared a constitutional amendment unconstitutional. The Court held that the Constitution contains an implicit material core that cannot be changed through the ordinary amendment process. Consequently, if an amendment violates a core provision, it will be struck down.

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Published on April 25, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Five Questions with Catarina Santos Botelho

—Richard Albert, William Stamps Farish Professor of Law, The University of Texas at Austin In “Five Questions” here at I-CONnect, we invite a public law scholar to answer five questions about his or her research. This edition of “Five Questions” features a short video interview with Catarina Santos Botelho, Assistant Professor and Department Chair of Constitutional Law

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Published on January 11, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Reviews