magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Constitution of Canada" (Page 2)
formats

Virtual Bookshelf: Understanding Constitutional Change in Canada–A Review of “Constitutional Amendment in Canada,” Edited by Emmett Macfarlane

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In his influential though dated study of formal amendment difficulty, Donald Lutz examines the amending procedures for 32 countries and concludes that the United States Constitution is the most difficult to amend.[1] Notwithstanding the all-important questions raised by Tom Ginsburg and James Melton–whether and how much the amending rule matters

Read More…

Published on September 21, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
formats

Invitation to Friends of I-CONnect: Conference on “Canada in the World: Comparative Perspectives on the Canadian Constitution”

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Friends of I-CONnect are invited to attend a full-day conference on “Canada in the World: Comparative Perspectives on the Canadian Constitution,” on Tuesday, April 12, at Yale Law School in New Haven, Connecticut. This conference will gather leading scholars in comparative public law to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Constitution

Read More…

Published on March 25, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Invitation to Friends of I-CONnect: Symposium on “Does Québec Need a Written Constitution?”

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Friends of I-CONnect are invited to attend a full-day symposium on “Does Québec Need a Written Constitution,” on Thursday, March 31, at Yale University. The program is structured around three panels and a keynote address by former Québec premier Jean Charest, whose cabinet considered codifying a constitution for the province. There

Read More…

Published on February 19, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Is the Constitution of Canada the World’s Most Difficult to Amend?

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Studies of constitutional rigidity suggest that the United States Constitution is one of the world’s most difficult to change by formal amendment.[1] In light of the low rate of amendment success in the United States, this is hard to dispute: of the over 11,000 amendment proposals introduced in Congress

Read More…

Published on June 16, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis