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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
Home Posts tagged "Constitution of Canada"
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“Quasi Constitutional” Status as *Not* Implying a Form Requirement

—Maxime St-Hilaire, Faculté de droit, Université de Sherbrooke In his post on this blog, Adam Perry writes that the British cases on what are known in the UK as constitutional statutes (and in Canada as quasi–constitutional statutes) “have been very controversial in constitutional circles”, whereas, by contrast, “the Canadian cases caused barely a ripple.” I would

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Published on August 8, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Conference Report–Symposium on “The Constitution of Canada: History, Evolution, Influence, and Reform”

—Asress Gikay, Matteo Monti, and Orlando Scarcello, Scuola Universitaria Superiore Sant’Anna Pisa (SSSA)–Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy On May 24, 2017, the Institute of Law, Politics and Development (Istituto di Diritto, Politica e Sviluppo) [DIRPOLIS] of Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies hosted a symposium on “The Constitution of Canada: History, Evolution, Influence & Reform”,

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Published on July 19, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The New Selection Process for the Supreme Court of Canada: A Global Constitutionalism Perspective

—Maxime St-Hilaire, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Sherbrooke Earlier this week on Monday, October 17th, Prime Minister (PM) Justin Trudeau announced the elevation of Justice Malcolm Rowe from the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador (Court of Appeal) to the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC). Filling the vacancy left by Justice Thomas Cromwell’s

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Published on October 20, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Virtual Bookshelf: Pre-Constitution Constitutions–A Review of “The Constitutions that Shaped Us,” Edited by Laforest, Brouillet, Gagnon and Tanguay

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School The National Constitutional Center in Philadelphia recently hosted a symposium on The Declaration of Independence as Introduction to the Constitution. Organized by Alexander Tsesis, the symposium brought together one dozen scholars in conversation around the Declaration of Independence. Their symposium papers have been published in a special issue of

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Published on October 5, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Virtual Bookshelf: Understanding Constitutional Change in Canada–A Review of “Constitutional Amendment in Canada,” Edited by Emmett Macfarlane

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In his influential though dated study of formal amendment difficulty, Donald Lutz examines the amending procedures for 32 countries and concludes that the United States Constitution is the most difficult to amend.[1] Notwithstanding the all-important questions raised by Tom Ginsburg and James Melton–whether and how much the amending rule matters

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Published on September 21, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Invitation to Friends of I-CONnect: Conference on “Canada in the World: Comparative Perspectives on the Canadian Constitution”

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Friends of I-CONnect are invited to attend a full-day conference on “Canada in the World: Comparative Perspectives on the Canadian Constitution,” on Tuesday, April 12, at Yale Law School in New Haven, Connecticut. This conference will gather leading scholars in comparative public law to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Constitution

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Published on March 25, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Invitation to Friends of I-CONnect: Symposium on “Does Québec Need a Written Constitution?”

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Friends of I-CONnect are invited to attend a full-day symposium on “Does Québec Need a Written Constitution,” on Thursday, March 31, at Yale University. The program is structured around three panels and a keynote address by former Québec premier Jean Charest, whose cabinet considered codifying a constitution for the province. There

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Published on February 19, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Is the Constitution of Canada the World’s Most Difficult to Amend?

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Studies of constitutional rigidity suggest that the United States Constitution is one of the world’s most difficult to change by formal amendment.[1] In light of the low rate of amendment success in the United States, this is hard to dispute: of the over 11,000 amendment proposals introduced in Congress

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Published on June 16, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis