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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "constitution-making" (Page 3)
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Egypt’s Constitution: The Religious Pot

–Mohamed Abdelaal, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Alexandria University School of Law Immediately after the Egyptian Revolution in 2011, which ended thirty years of repression and dictatorship under the regime of former President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians faced the serious challenge of electing a new president and building a new Egypt. Amidst these

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Published on May 2, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Bachelet Appoints Group to Study New Constitution for Chile

—Claudia Heiss, Instituto de Asuntos Publicos, Universidad de Chile On April 23rd former President of Chile Michelle Bachelet (2006-2010), the front-runner candidate for the November presidential election, announced a commission to study a new constitution. The group is composed of nine lawyers (including two women) some of whom contributed to the 2005 reform signed by

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Published on May 1, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Ireland’s Constitutional Convention Considers Same-Sex Marriage: Part II

—Eoin Carolan, University College Dublin Ireland’s Constitutional Convention has voted overwhelmingly in favour of a proposal to amend the Irish Constitution to allow for civil marriage for same-sex couples. 79 Convention members favoured the proposal with 19 against and 1 expressing no opinion. There was also a similarly large majority in favour of a directive

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Published on April 25, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Constitutional Future of Venezuela

—David Landau, FSU College of Law Hugo Chavez’s death poses important questions about the constitutional future of a country that many political analysts have seen as a hybrid or competitive authoritarian regime – that is, somewhere between pure democracy and dictatorship. These regimes have elections, and real elections, but the playing field is highly uneven

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Published on March 31, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Creating a Constitutional Process Design for Libya via Constitutional Amendment

—Lorianne Updike Toler, The Constitutional Sources Project & Lorianne Updike Toler Consulting. The feared unrest in Libya prior to 15 February and now the confusion introduced by the Libyan Supreme Court’s decision last Tuesday to invalidate Amendment No. 3 of Libya’s Constitutional Declaration can all be attributed to the poor constitutional design of the Declaration

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Published on March 8, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Constitution-Making in Turkey: Towards a Presidential System?

—Ozan Varol, Assistant Professor, Lewis & Clark Law School Although recent academic and popular commentary on constitution-making has largely focused on the constitutional transitions in progress across the Arab World, I wanted to take this opportunity to update the I•CON community on the constitution-drafting process currently underway in Turkey.  In this post, I will provide

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Published on December 3, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Awful Process, Terrible Ending and (Most likely) Disastrous Results

—Andrew Arato, Dorothy Hart Hirshon Professor of Political and Social Theory, The New School No serious interpreter has claimed that the Egyptian constitution-making process has been satisfactory or even adequate. Even in the context of revolutionary populist constitution making to which this case belongs, the Egyptian version is distinguished by its inconsistencies and idiosyncrasies. In revolutions,

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Published on November 29, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Is Egypt’s Transition to Democracy Really So Stupid?

—William Partlett, Columbia University Law School & Brookings Institution [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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Egypt and the Forgotten Lessons of Democratic Transitions (Or: Democracy is Hard)

—David Landau, Florida State University College of Law [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about the

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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The Military, Constitutional Democracy, and Egypt

—Ozan Varol, Lewis & Clark Law School [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about the pace

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices