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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "constitution-making" (Page 2)
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The Constitution-Making Process in Chile: A Cautionary Tale from Turkey

—Claudia Heiss, Universidad de Chile & Oya Yegen, Boston University On April 21, President Michelle Bachelet of Chile delivered the second public address to Congress of her term. During that address, she reaffirmed that she would pursue constitutional changes to the 1980 Constitution written under military dictatorship, although she left open key questions about procedure.

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Published on June 19, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, Uncategorized
 
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Video Interview: Courts and Constitution-Making Featuring Will Partlett

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of our new video interview series at I-CONnect, I interview Will Partlett on the role of courts in constitution-making. In the interview, we discuss constitution-making in general, his recent work on constitution-making in Russia and post-communist countries, as well as the relationship between political culture and constitutional structure. We

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Published on November 25, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Which Citizens? – Participation in the Drafting of the Icelandic Constitutional Draft of 2011

—Ragnhildur Helgadóttir, Reykjavik University School of Law The Icelandic draft constitution of 2011 has received wide attention, including on this blog. One reason for that is the emphasis placed on public participation in the drafting process. In its (otherwise quite critical) opinion, the Venice Commission (the European Commission for Democracy through Law) wrote: The wide range

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Published on October 7, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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International IDEA Releases Annual Report on Constitution Building

–Sumit Bisarya, Senior Project Manager, International IDEA Constitution Building Programme “Constitution Building – A Global Review (2013)” is the first in an annual series of publications from the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (International IDEA). The full report, which was published just last week, is available at no cost here. The Review looks

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Published on October 1, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Leaving Westminster: Constitutional Supremacy in an Independent Scotland

–Stephen Tierney, Professor of Constitutional Theory, University of Edinburgh and Director of the Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law; ESRC Senior Research Fellow, Future of the UK and Scotland programme On 16 June the Scottish Government unveiled its Scottish Independence Bill in an address by Nicola Sturgeon, Deputy First Minister of Scotland, to the Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional

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Published on June 24, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Time and Sequence in Changes of Constitutional Regimes

—Andrew Arato, The New School for Social Research Introduction The concept of the constituent power emerged in the revolutions of the 17th and 18th centuries. Many new constitutions since then were made through variety of non-revolutionary processes. Yet, the normative link between democratic forms of constitution making and revolution, deeply embedded in the notion of

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Published on June 21, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Tunisia’s New Constitution: Progress and Challenges to Come

–Zaid Al-Ali (Senior Advisor, International IDEA) and Donia Ben Romdhane (Senior Advisor, International IDEA) [Cross-posted from Open Democracy] In spite of a number of serious challenges, the Tunisian Constituent Assembly – under the people’s ever watchful eye – successfully negotiated a new and modern constitution. In 2011, the political class was far from prepared for

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Published on February 21, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Constituent Dilemma in Latin America

–Gabriel L. Negretto, Associate Professor, Division of Political Studies, CIDE Since the great revolutions of the late eighteenth century, the central principle of democratic constitutionalism has been that the people, as the supreme authority in a polity, is the only legitimate author of constitutions. This principle was enshrined in the theory of constituent power, according

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Published on September 9, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Egypt’s new constitutional declaration: Back to square one?

–Zaid Al-Ali, International IDEA(cross-posted from www.foreignpolicy.com) On July 8, Adli Mansour, Egypt’s new interim president who until recently was a member of the country’s Supreme Constitutional Court, issued yet another “constitutional declaration.”  This comes after a year of failed leadership by former President Mohamed Morsi, the historic June 30 demonstrations, the intervention by the military,

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Published on July 11, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Should the Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendments Doctrine be Part of the Canon?

—David Landau, Florida State University College of Law The concept of substantively unconstitutional constitutional amendments, for example in the Indian “basic structure” doctrine, presents one of the strangest puzzles in comparative constitutional law. It raises obvious and substantial problems from the standpoint of democratic theory, raising a kind of ultimate counter-majoritarian difficulty. The court using

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Published on June 10, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis