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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "constitution-making"
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The Constitutional Reform Referendum in Chile: Balancing Democracy and Elite Accommodation

—Alexander Hudson, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, and Rodolfo Disi Pavlic, Temuco Catholic University [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. For more information about our four columnists for 2020, please click here.] Next month, citizens of Chile will go to the polls to decide whether

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Published on September 23, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Why Replacing the Brazilian Constitution Is Not a Good Idea: A Response to Professor Bruce Ackerman

—Thomas da Rosa Bustamante, Emilio Peluso Neder Meyer, Marcelo Andrade Cattoni de Oliveira, Federal University of Minas Gerais; Jane Reis Gonçalves Pereira, Rio de Janeiro State University; Juliano Zaiden Benvindo and Cristiano Paixão, University of Brasília In a provocative piece that was first published in Portuguese and then in an English version on ICONnect, Professor

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Published on July 28, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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“Constituent Power” and Referendums in Quebec: Instrumentalizing Sieyès?

—Maxime St-Hilaire, Université de Sherbrooke In Quebec nationalist constitutional thinking, the holding of a referendum is sometimes explicitly connected with the (somewhat fashionably) internationally revived idea of “pouvoir constituant”. Beyond proposals for referendums on secession or on the ratification of the constitution of an independent Quebec, there are now calls for holding a referendum on

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Published on June 24, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Book Review: Lorianne Updike Toler on “Constitution Writing, Religion, and Democracy” (Asli Ü. Bâli and Hanna Lerner eds.)

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Lorianne Updike Toler reviews Constitution Writing, Religion, and Democracy (Asli Ü. Bâli and Hanna Lerner, eds., Cambridge University Press, 2017).] —Lorianne Updike Toler, Visiting Fellow, Information Society Project, Yale Law School Constitution Writing, Religion and Democracy edited by Asli Ü. Bâli and Hanna Lerner (Cambridge University Press,

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Published on April 16, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Sudan’s Constitutional Charter is a Ray of Hope but Tough Times Lie Ahead

–Waikwa Wanyoike, Strategic Litigation Director, Open Society Justice Initiative – London On August 4, 2019, an historic agreement was signed in Sudan between the Forces of Freedom and Change (FFC) and the Military Transition Council (MTC). The FFC is the revolutionary group that triggered the removal of the long-term autocratic leader Ahmad Al Bashir. The

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Published on August 13, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Rise and Fall of a Constitutional Moment: Lessons from the Chilean Experiment and the Failure of Bachelet’s Project

—Sergio Verdugo, Professor of Constitutional Law, Universidad del Desarrollo / JSD candidate, New York University; and Jorge Contesse, Assistant Professor of Law, Rutgers Law School Five days before stepping down as president of Chile, Michelle Bachelet sent a bill to the Chilean Congress proposing a new constitutional text aimed at replacing the current Constitution.  The adoption of a

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Published on March 13, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Chilean Presidential Election and the Constituent Process

–Alberto Coddou Mc Manus, Observatory of the Chilean Constituent Process Next Sunday, November 19, Chile will celebrate one of the most important presidential elections since the return to democracy in 1990s. According to different opinion polls, Sebastian Piñera, a right-wing millionaire, will most likely receive the highest number of votes in the first round, and

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Published on November 14, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Assessing the Risks of Constitutional Revisions (I-CONnect Column)

—Aslı Bâli, UCLA School of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on September 3, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Book Review: Cornelia Weiss on Helen Irving’s “Constitutions and Gender”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Cornelia Weiss reviews Helen Irving’s Constitutions and Gender (Edward Elgar 2017)] –Cornelia Weiss, Colonel, U.S. Air Force Reserve Judge Advocate Corps* As incredible as it seems, it was not until 1971 that the U.S. Supreme Court ever declared a statute that discriminated against women as unconstitutional.  That

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Published on August 9, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Video Interview: Get to Know the Center for Constitutional Democracy at Indiana University

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of our video interview series at I-CONnect, I interview Susan Williams and David Williams from the Center for Constitutional Democracy (CCD). Both chaired professors at the Maurer School of Law at Indiana University, Susan and David Williams serve as Director and Executive Director, respectively, of the

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Published on February 15, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews