magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "constitution-making process"
formats

International Assistance to Constitution Making between Principle and Expediency

—Mara Malagodi, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Law [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.] In the aftermath of the Cold War many countries underwent political transitions coupled with extensive constitutional changes. Constitution making has also increasingly

Read More…

Published on January 13, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

The Institutional Interest of Political Parties in Chile’s Constitution-Making Process

—Benjamin Alemparte, Duke University School of Law These are times of constitutional change in Chile.[1] On October 25, the referendum’s approval option for drafting a new Constitution won with close to 80% of the general vote, the most significant electoral gap in the country’s history. Notably, more than 50% of the registered electorate went to vote,

Read More…

Published on November 17, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Symposium on Chilean Referendum Part V: The Times They Are A-Changin’

[Editor’s Note: This is the final post in I-CONnect’s five-part symposium on the recent Chilean referendum authorizing a new constitution-making process. The symposium was organized by Professors José Francisco García and Sergio Verdugo, whose introduction is available here.] —Patricio Zapata, Universidad Católica de Chile[1] It was just two months after that great march on Washington for

Read More…

Published on November 7, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Symposium on Chilean Referendum Part IV: On the Debate of the Constitutional Recognition of Indigenous Peoples in Chile

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the recent Chilean referendum authorizing a new constitution-making process. The symposium was organized by Professors José Francisco García and Sergio Verdugo, whose introduction is available here.] —Isabel Aninat, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez The Chilean Constitution, as well as all previous constitutions in Chile, is silent in

Read More…

Published on November 6, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Symposium on Chilean Referendum Part III: A Feminist Rethinking of the Chilean Constitution?

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the recent Chilean referendum authorizing a new constitution-making process. The symposium was organized by Professors José Francisco García and Sergio Verdugo, whose introduction is available here.] —Marcela Prieto Rudolphy, USC Gould School of Law[*] “El patriarcado es un juez, que nos juzga por nacer. Y

Read More…

Published on November 5, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Symposium on Chilean Referendum Part II: Chile: The Constituent Dilemma

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a five-part symposium on the recent Chilean referendum authorizing a new constitution-making process. The symposium was organized by Professors José Francisco García and Sergio Verdugo, whose introduction is available here.] —Juan Luis Ossa, Centro de Estudios Públicos  In the early morning of November 15, 2019, most of Chile’s representatives

Read More…

Published on November 3, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

New Constitution or Nothing! The Promise and Pitfalls of Chile’s Constitutional Moment

—Lisa Hilbink, Department of Political Science, University of Minnesota[1] In the wee hours of Friday, November 15th, Chile reached a historic milestone: Congressional representatives from nearly all political parties, across the political spectrum, signed an agreement to open the path to a new constitution. After four dramatic weeks of mass protests, and following two long

Read More…

Published on November 24, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Mapping Constitutional Success: A New Study on Process

—Lorianne Updike Toler, Libertas Constitutional Consulting Amidst the chaos of Libya’s civil war, the Constitution Drafting Assembly (CDA) remains the lone institution recognized as legitimate by both sides of the conflict.  Headed by the stubbornly thoughtful—and stubbornly neutral—Waleed Al-Tahourni, the CDA’s eight committees are feverishly attempting to maintain what little legitimacy remains in the country

Read More…

Published on August 7, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis