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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "comparative constitutional law"
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On the Legacy of Justice Scalia in Dobbs: The Lack of Comparative Analysis

–Stefanus Hendrianto, Pontifical Gregorian University Much has been and will be written about Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the decision by the Supreme Court of the United States which held that the Constitution of the United States does not confer a right to abortion, and which overruled both Roe v. Wade (1973) and Planned

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Published on August 3, 2022
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Grappling with the Civil-Common Law Divide in Constitutional Law

—Maartje De Visser, Singapore Management University, Yong Pung How School of Law [Editor’s Note: This is one of our ICONnect columns. For more on our 2022 columnists, see here.] Considerable attention has been devoted, in comparative law generally, to classificatory efforts. A quintessential distinction is that between the civil and the common law traditions, which

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Published on July 20, 2022
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Towards a More Inclusive Constitutional Discourse: Overcoming Linguistic Barriers

—Maartje De Visser, Singapore Management University, Yong Pung How School of Law [Editor’s Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our 2022 columnists, see here.] The rise of English as the lingua franca is a well-known phenomenon that has affected many areas of our lives. When it comes to

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Published on May 18, 2022
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Can There be Classics of Comparative Constitutional Law Theory?

—Bryan Dennis G. Tiojanco, Project Associate Professor, University of Tokyo, Graduate Schools for Law and Politics. Twitter: @botiojanco [Editor’s Note: This is one of our ICONnect columns. For more on our 2022 columnists, see here.] In a paper talk I gave late last month I got advice that had me thinking about the question above.

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Published on March 17, 2022
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Slovakia Amends the Constitution to Cap the Retirement Age

—Simon Drugda, PhD Candidate at the University of Copenhagen On March 28, 2019, the Slovak Parliament amended the Constitution to cap the retirement age at 64. The imposition of retirement age is quite an unusual design feature in comparative constitutional law. In this post, I introduce the amendment and provide context for the change.

Published on May 16, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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I–CONnect Symposium: The 30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea—Introduction: Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a special symposium on the 30th anniversary of the Constitutional Court of Korea. The Court marked this historic moment last year in 2018. We are grateful to Professor Kyu Ho Youm for convening this symposium with a diverse array of participants. We hope this symposium will inspire more research

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Published on March 5, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Book Review: Bogdan Iancu on Bianca Selejan-Guțan’s “The Constitution of Romania: A Contextual Analysis”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Bogdan Iancu reviews Bianca Selejan-Guțan’s book on The Constitution of Romania: A Contextual Analysis.] Contextualizing Romania’s Fragmented Constitutionalism —Bogdan Iancu, Associate Professor (Comparative Constitutional Law and Constitutional Theory), University of Bucharest, Faculty of Political Science For a long time after the collapse of state socialism, the countries that had

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Published on April 27, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Leading by Opposition: Justice Scalia and Comparative Constitutional Law

—Claudia E. Haupt, Columbia Law School As tributes to Justice Antonin Scalia are pouring in, a common theme is emerging among those of us who tended to disagree with him in most cases: he made us think harder. As Jamal Greene, himself a scholar of comparative constitutional law, remarked: “What he did was change how

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Published on February 24, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Video Interview: Developments in Irish Constitutional Law Featuring Eoin Carolan

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In the first installment of our new video interview series at I-CONnect, Eoin Carolan discusses developments in Irish constitutional law. The interview touches on recent referenda in Ireland, the relative ease of formal amendment under the Irish Constitution, the continuing debate on abortion, and the country’s experiment with a Constitutional

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Published on September 12, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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A Conversation with Mark Kende on South African Constitutional Law

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of I-CONnect’s interview series, I speak with Mark Kende about his work on South African constitutional law. Professor Kende holds the James Madison Chair in Constitutional Law at Drake Law School, where he teaches constitutional law, comparative constitutional law, civil rights and civil procedure. In our interview, Professor Kende discusses

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Published on October 22, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis